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Retrievable IVC Filter

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Retrievable IVC Filters have High Rates of Failure

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a severe life-threatening condition that occurs when a lower extremity blood clot migrates to the lungs and embolizes. If the PE goes untreated, the mortality rate can be as high as 30 percent. A PE is a quiet killer, often occurring without any symptoms, according to an article published by Medscape, an informative online medical journal. A common method to prevent PE is anticoagulation, or blood thinning, medication. Not all patients, however, can tolerate blood thinners. That’s where blood clot filters come into play. A blood clot filter such as an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is ... Read More

Retrievable IVC Filter Migrated, Tilted and Eroded

Anthony G. from California has filed a lawsuit against Rex Medical over its Option Retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, which migrated, tilted and eroded into his vein. Anthony was inserted with a retrievable IVC filter on Sept. 11, 2011 at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center in Carson City, Nevada, after a history of blood clots. An IVC filter is a cage-like device inserted the vena cava, the largest vein in the body, and is designed to catch blood clots before they reach the heart or lungs, resulting in pulmonary embolism (PE). Five years after the procedure, when he began experiencing shortness ... Read More

Retrievable IVC filter failure promps Lawsuit Against Rex Medical

An Oklahoma man has filed a lawsuit against Rex Medical alleging injuries related to the manufacturer’s inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, which was designed to be temporary but which doctors have been unable to remove. On Feb. 12, 2016, Ronald L. had an Option ELITE Retrievable IVC filter surgically inserted by doctors at Community Hospital in Oklahoma City. He had been admitted for hip surgery, and the filter was placed just in case he might form a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) in the legs. The filter is designed catch blood clots before they reach the heart or lungs, resulting in pulmonary embolism. A DVT is ... Read More

After Three Failed Attempts, retrievable IVC Filter Could Not be Removed

When Jesse K. was in a car accident, Luther Hospital in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, implanted an Option ELITE Retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter on Dec. 7, 2015, even though he did not have a blood clot. An IVC filter is a device that resembles a spider, inserted into the largest vein in the body, the vena cava. It is designed to catch blood clots before they enter the heart or lungs causing pulmonary embolism. Some IVC filters are designed to stay in the body permanently and others are made to be temporary, or retrievable. Retrievable IVC filters are recommended by the U.S. Food and ... Read More

Alabama man files lawsuit alleging injuries linked to retrievable IVC filter

When Billy J. S., an Alabama resident, was found to be at serious risk for a blood clot in January 2007, he was implanted with a Recovery inferior vena cava (IVC) filter at a local hospital in the state. The filter is a small, cage-like device inserted into the inferior vena cava to capture blood clots and prevent them from reaching the lungs. Billy didn’t know that the Recovery filter had been pulled from the market two years earlier due to reported injuries and deaths linked to the device. No recall or safety warnings were issued. Doctors and patients remained unaware ... Read More

Man endures two procedures to Remove Retrievable IVC Filter Stuck in Vein

South Carolina resident Ronald D. was given an Option Elite retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter on April 19, 2015. Ronald was a patient at the University Hospital in Augusta, Georgia, at the time. A year later, on April 12, 2016, the same doctor who implanted the IVC filter attempted to remove it, until he discovered the filter was tilted at a 45 degree angle. The retrieval hook was embedded in the wall of the vein. Unfortunately, the doctor was unable to retrieve the filter. Ten weeks later, Ronald went to another doctor to request removal. After an extremely risky ... Read More

Retrievable IVC Filters may fracture if not removed as prescribed

Following a car accident, a 33-year-old man was brought to the Boston Medical Center (BMC), New England’s largest trauma center. He received an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, a retrievable model called the G2 made by C.R. Bard. He was not advised of needed follow-up care, and returned to the hospital five years later with chest pains. Upon further testing, the medical team discovered that his IVC filter had fractured, and a strut of the filter had been lodged in a pulmonary artery. He underwent a fluoroscopic procedure, successfully retrieving the broken strut as well as the filter before it could do any ... Read More

Lawsuits Against C.R. Bard for allegedly Faulty Retrievable IVC Filters Converge in Phoenix

A federal judge in Phoenix has been appointed to oversee an upwards of 400 cases in a multidistrict litigation (MDL) in which patients claim C.R. Bard manufactured a defective product with the retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. IVC filters are cage-like devices that are implanted in the largest vein of the body. Their purpose is to catch blood clots, preventing them from reaching the heart or lungs, particularly in patients that cannot take anticoagulation medication. Retrievable IVC filters are meant to be temporary, and the FDA recommends retrieval between 29 and 54 days after insertion. Bard’s retrievable filters are the Recovery, G2 and G2 Express. ... Read More

A Large Percentage of Retrievable IVC Filters had No Retrieval Date Set

In a study conducted at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center from 2001-2006, patients who received a retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter were tracked for potential plans to retrieve the filter. IVC filters are cage-like devices that are implanted in the largest vein of the body. Their purpose is to catch blood clots, preventing them from reaching the heart or lungs, particularly in patients that cannot take anticoagulation medication. Retrievable IVC filters are different than permanent filters. The permanent filters are strong and intended to be left in the body for years. But retrievable filters are meant ... Read More

Not All Retrievable IVC Filters are Able to be Retrieved

An inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a cage-like device that is inserted into the largest vein in the body, with intention to catch blood clots before they travel to the heart and/or lungs. Retrievable IVC filters are designed to be inserted only temporarily, and then removed between 29 and 54 days after insertion. According to RadiologyInfo.org, a website operated by the Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA), however, even filters designed and intended to be retrievable are not always able to be retrieved. Many retrievable IVC filters models such as C.R. Bard’s Recovery, G2 and G2 Express, as well as Cook Medical’s Gunther ... Read More