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Environmental 1070 articles

Concern for environmental issues is not new to Beasley Allen. While serving as Lt. Governor for the State of Alabama, in 1971 the firm’s future Principal & Founder Jere Beasley vowed to take control of pollution laws out of the hands of big utilities and special interest groups, and put it back into the hands of the average citizen.

Protection of people and their property from large corporate polluters is still our top priority. A unique feature of our growing environmental toxic tort practice is the ability to represent a large number of people harmed by damage to their property. Our attorneys are fighting to make a difference in the lives of those threatened by environmental toxins that contaminate waterways, soil and wildlife, endangering human health and life.

Study focuses on most effective treatment for peritoneal mesothelioma

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) awarded a research grant to detect gene mutations in specific subtypes of peritoneal mesothelioma in hopes of identifying already available therapies for these patients as well as developing new screening tools. The study, led by Waqas Amin, M.D., with the University of Pittsburgh, will analyze three histological subtypes (epithelioid, biphasic and sarcomatoid) in peritoneal mesothelioma to find the most significant gene mutations for better characterization and identification of genetic variants. Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer associated with asbestos exposure. Peritoneal mesothelioma is the second most common type of the disease, affecting ... Read More

Imerys files for bankruptcy amid mounting talc litigation

Johnson & Johnson’s talc supplier, Imerys Talc America, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in an effort to protect itself against more than 14,600 lawsuits in the U.S. that claim its talc causes cancer. Imerys Talc Vermont and Imerys Talc Canada Inc., also filed for bankruptcy. All three are subsidiaries of Paris-based Imerys SA. The filing will enable the companies to establish a trust to fund current and future claims. All lawsuits against the company involving cancer claims will also be centralized under one judge. “After carefully evaluating all possible options, we determined pursuing Chapter 11 protection is the best ... Read More

Fracking Company Antero Pays $3.15M to Settle West Virginia Water Pollution Allegations

Antero Resources Corporation agreed to pay the U.S. government and state of West Virginia $3.15 million for violations of the Clean Water Act that allegedly polluted the environment in 32 locations across northern West Virginia. The settlement underscores some of the environmental hazards that the fracking industry is unleashing on public lands. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, Antero illegally disposed of dredged and fill materials used in the fracking process into U.S. waters or near sites where the company had constructed well pads, compressor stations, impoundments, pipeline crossings, access roads, and other structures associated with its hydraulic fracturing ... Read More

Tens of thousands of asbestos fibers found in majority of talc samples

A scientist who heads a company that specializes in detecting microscopic asbestos fibers in samples of talc said he found up to 55,000 fibers of the carcinogenic mineral per gram in six out of seven samples from a Korean talc mine, which means that a 10-ounce bottle of talcum powder could contain as much as 14 million asbestos fibers, Law360 reported. The scientist, William Longo, is an electron microscopist who serves as president of Material Analytical Services, a company that specializes in finding near-invisible bits of asbestos in various samples. His equipment is highly sensitive – far more so than ... Read More

Canadian parliament member calls for independent safety review of glyphosate

Canadian Member of Parliament (MP) Carol Hughes is pressing the Canadian government to conduct an independent review of glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weed killer Roundup, to determine the effects of the herbicide on users and whether the chemical can cause cancer. “There was a presentation made at a meeting I recently attended, and one of the lawyers on hand had argued the case in the U.S. that their client, a groundskeeper, had been exposed to the herbicide glyphosate in Roundup and has terminal cancer. It is believed it is caused by years of his exposure to glyphosate,” said ... Read More

Regulatory Rollbacks Put Profits Over Public Health, Environment

Coal, oil, gas and other big industrial polluters are poised to make billions of dollars in added profits due to the Trump Administration’s environmental and safety rollbacks, but an Associated Press analysis of government records reveals the price Americans will pay in lives lost and health. The AP looked at 11 major rules on the Trump Administration’s chopping block and calculated the cost those regulatory rollbacks would have in terms of environmental and human health, using the administration’s own estimates. The news agency found an alarming upswing in the number of premature deaths, air-pollution-induced illnesses, climate-warming emissions, and severe train ... Read More

Meso Foundation grantee to study why some patients don’t respond to treatment

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) has awarded a research grant to designed to identify biomarkers that will help pinpoint which pleural mesothelioma patients would respond better to combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy before they undergo therapy in order to prevent unnecessary toxicities and waste of precious treatment time. Pleural mesothelioma is the most common type of mesothelioma, a rare but deadly cancer associated with asbestos exposure. Pleural mesothelioma develops in the lining of the lungs and can take up to 50 years to develop. Once diagnosed, the prognosis is generally poor with most patients dying within 12 to 24 ... Read More

Widow awarded $5.1 million for husband’s asbestos-related death

Fisher Controls International LLC was hit with a $5.1 million verdict by a South Carolina jury that found the company’s asbestos-containing valves were the cause of a deceased employee’s fatal mesothelioma. Thomas Harold Glenn worked as a pipe fitter and instrumentation technician at various Duke Energy power plants, including three nuclear power plants, for 27 years from 1970 to 1997. As part of his job, Glenn would remove and inspect pumps and valves from pipelines, and often worked with gaskets that contained asbestos, as well as around others who were replacing valves made by Fisher. In late 2014, Glenn was ... Read More

Companies hit with $18 million verdict for exposing mechanic to asbestos

An Arkansas federal jury awarded a deceased mechanic’s son $18 million after finding that Honeywell International, among other parties, were responsible for causing his father’s fatal mesothelioma, Law360 reports. Ronald Burlie Thomas filed a lawsuit against 11 companies including Honeywell and Ford Motor Company. He died at the age of 72 in December 2017. Following Mr. Thomas’ death, his son, Michael Lyn Thomas, stepped in as the plaintiff. Ronald Thomas claimed that he was exposed to asbestos in materials he used while working as a mechanic. Honeywell’s predecessor, Bendix Corp., made the brakes that the jury determined were the source ... Read More

Experimental compound effective for some relapsing AML cases

Purdue University researchers are developing a series of drug compounds to treat recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive and deadly blood cancer. About 19,520 people are diagnosed with AML each year, and about 10,670 die from it, according to the American Cancer Society. About 30 percent of AML patients have an FLT3 enzyme mutation that makes the disease more aggressive. Patients treated with new drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) – Radapt and Gilteritinib, both FLT3 inhibitors – have shown good initial response to treating leukemia. But AML patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors often relapse ... Read More