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Pharmaceutical 7430 articles

Beasley Allen has one of the largest and most technologically advanced Mass Torts practices in the country. The Mass Torts division represents numerous people in claims against companies that manufacture and/or market defective pharmaceuticals and/or medical devices. The resources devoted to this division allow the firm to competently and conscientiously handle any group of cases, no matter how large, along with particular catastrophic injury cases.

Our firm was recently involved in one of the greatest victories in Mass Torts history, against drug manufacturer Merck regarding the drug Vioxx. After more than five years of hard-fought and difficult litigation, Merck agreed to pay $4.85 billion, the largest pharmaceutical settlement in U.S. history, to resolve certain Vioxx-related claims involving plaintiffs who suffered a heart attack, including sudden cardiac death, or a stroke.

Study focuses on most effective treatment for peritoneal mesothelioma

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) awarded a research grant to detect gene mutations in specific subtypes of peritoneal mesothelioma in hopes of identifying already available therapies for these patients as well as developing new screening tools. The study, led by Waqas Amin, M.D., with the University of Pittsburgh, will analyze three histological subtypes (epithelioid, biphasic and sarcomatoid) in peritoneal mesothelioma to find the most significant gene mutations for better characterization and identification of genetic variants. Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer associated with asbestos exposure. Peritoneal mesothelioma is the second most common type of the disease, affecting ... Read More

Imerys files for bankruptcy amid mounting talc litigation

Johnson & Johnson’s talc supplier, Imerys Talc America, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in an effort to protect itself against more than 14,600 lawsuits in the U.S. that claim its talc causes cancer. Imerys Talc Vermont and Imerys Talc Canada Inc., also filed for bankruptcy. All three are subsidiaries of Paris-based Imerys SA. The filing will enable the companies to establish a trust to fund current and future claims. All lawsuits against the company involving cancer claims will also be centralized under one judge. “After carefully evaluating all possible options, we determined pursuing Chapter 11 protection is the best ... Read More

Meso Foundation grantee to study why some patients don’t respond to treatment

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) has awarded a research grant to designed to identify biomarkers that will help pinpoint which pleural mesothelioma patients would respond better to combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy before they undergo therapy in order to prevent unnecessary toxicities and waste of precious treatment time. Pleural mesothelioma is the most common type of mesothelioma, a rare but deadly cancer associated with asbestos exposure. Pleural mesothelioma develops in the lining of the lungs and can take up to 50 years to develop. Once diagnosed, the prognosis is generally poor with most patients dying within 12 to 24 ... Read More

Abuse-deterrent OxyContin may have contributed to rise in hepatitis C

When the first abuse-deterrent formulation of the opioid OxyContin was introduced in 2010 as a way to deter misuse of the drug, it may have set off an increase in hepatitis C infections by pushing users toward injectable heroin, a new study suggests. Acute hepatitis C infections in the United States were declining in the 1990s and plateaued around 2003. But beginning in 2010, rates have been rising. Researchers with RAND Corporation told Medscape Medical News that while hepatitis C infection rates rose nationwide after abuse-deterrent OxyContin was introduced, states with higher rates of OxyContin misuse prior to the reformulation ... Read More

Recalls cause shortage of high blood pressure drugs

Sweeping recalls of a class of high blood pressure drugs known as ARBs, or angiotensin II receptor blockers, has resulted in a shortage, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb and FDA director of drug evaluation and research Dr. Janet Woodcock said in a joint statement. And the problem will probably get worse. The shortage is among ARBs that contain the active drug ingredient valsartan, and may soon also affect other ARBs that contain losartan and irbesartan. The shortage is due to recalls of the drug over an unexpected impurity, which was identified as a chemical called NDMA ... Read More

FDA approves new treatment for people addicted to opioids

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new prescription digital therapeutic (PDT) for people with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD). reSET-O is immediately available and is another effort to help curb the effects of the nation’s opioid epidemic. Sandoz Inc., a division of Novartis, and Pear Therapeutics Inc., are jointly launching reSET-O, a 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy intended as an outpatient therapy for patients addicted to opioids but trying to stay clean. reSET-O includes a transmucosal buprenorphine, a commonly used medication to treat opioid addiction, as well as contingency management that provides incentives to reinforce behaviors. Once reSET-O is ... Read More

Insys founder paid kickbacks to docs to prescribe its addictive fentanyl

Insys Therapeutics Inc.’s founder and four of its executives stooped to new lows to entice doctors to prescribe their pricey opioid spray Subsys, treating them to lavish dinners, putting them on its payroll, and even giving one top prescriber of the drug a lap dance, Assistant U.S. Attorney David G. Lazarus told a federal jury in Boston in the trial of former Insys chairman and founder John Kapoor. Kapoor, along with other company executives, is facing charges of using bribes and kickbacks to increase sales of Subsys, a highly addictive spray version of the opioid fentanyl. “This is a case ... Read More

Recovered opioid addict shares her struggle to come clean

Sara, 29, didn’t believe she would ever become addicted to opioids because a doctor had prescribed the medication. During treatment for a medical condition, Sara was put on a morphine drip. The drip continued throughout the duration of her hospital stay. When she left the hospital, she was given a supply of pain killers. “I didn’t realize for another year or two that I probably left the hospital that day dependent on opioid pain medication.” As the physical addiction took hold of Sara, she began to feel sick. Her tolerance to the drugs increased, and she needed more and more ... Read More

As drug companies recall heart drug valsartan, other companies hike prices

Beginning in July, Teva Pharmaceuticals and Prinston Pharmaceuticals rolled out a series of recalls on the high blood pressure and heart failure medicine valsartan after a probable carcinogen was found in the drug. Another company, unaffected by the issue, saw a rare opportunity. Alembic Pharmaceuticals rushed to hike the prices of its similar drugs anywhere from 329 percent to 469 percent. And when the same potentially cancer-causing impurity was found in another high blood pressure medication, irbesartan, Alembic hiked the price of its irbesartan, too. The tactic proved an overwhelming success for the company, which reported “massive growth” in U.S. ... Read More

Infants’ ibuprofen drops recalled due to higher concentrations

Six lots of generic Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops for infants manufactured by Tris Pharma Inc., and sold at CVS Pharmacy, Wal-Mart Stores, and Family Dollar are being recalled because some units may contain a higher levels of ibuprofen concentration. Some bottles of the ibuprofen concentrate were found to contain as much as 10 percent above the limit specified on the packaging. Infants who are already susceptible to ibuprofen side effects may be at a slightly higher risk if they are given a higher concentration of the medication from an affected bottle. For example, these babies may be more vulnerable to ... Read More