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Pharmaceutical 3260 articles

Beasley Allen has one of the largest and most technologically advanced Mass Torts practices in the country. The Mass Torts division represents numerous people in claims against companies that manufacture and/or market defective pharmaceuticals and/or medical devices. The resources devoted to this division allow the firm to competently and conscientiously handle any group of cases, no matter how large, along with particular catastrophic injury cases.

Our firm was recently involved in one of the greatest victories in Mass Torts history, against drug manufacturer Merck regarding the drug Vioxx. After more than five years of hard-fought and difficult litigation, Merck agreed to pay $4.85 billion, the largest pharmaceutical settlement in U.S. history, to resolve certain Vioxx-related claims involving plaintiffs who suffered a heart attack, including sudden cardiac death, or a stroke.

Anti-addiction groups call for FDA chief’s resignation amid prescription drug abuse epidemic

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Frustrated by the Food and Drug Administration’s approval of potent opioid medications during a nationwide epidemic of prescription drug abuse, anti-addiction activists are calling for the resignation of the agency’s top official. More than a dozen groups have banded together and are appealing to the Obama administration to replace FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, who has headed up the agency since 2009. Activists have been vocal about their disappointment with the agency for its approval of Zohydro, the only single-ingredient hydrocodone on the market. Hydrocodone is in a class of narcotics known as opioids, which are known for their euphoric effects. ... Read More

Pinnacle hip implant executive pressed to show safety tests on device

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Attorneys for a woman who was poisoned by an allegedly defective hip implant grilled an executive at Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy Orthopaedics unit over what studies the company performed on its Pinnacle metal-on-metal hip replacement system in an attempt to show jurors that the company was negligent in proofing the device’s safety before they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000. Plaintiff Kathy Herlihy-Paoli’s lawsuit is the first of more than 6,000 lawsuits claiming DePuy’s Pinnacle hip implants caused injuries from premature failures and corrosion of the metal parts causing a type of blood poisoning known ... Read More

Drug company to seek FDA approval for first ‘female Viagra’

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Sprout Pharmaceuticals says it will resubmit an application for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its “female Viagra” pill by the end of the year in hopes of having the first marketed pill to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder, or HSDD, in women. HSDD is the most commonly reported female complaint and is characterized by a decreased libido that causes personal distress or personal difficulties. An estimated 1 in 10 women are affected by the disorder. Filbanserin is a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist that was initially investigated as an antidepressant. Preclinical studies suggest that fibanserin targets ... Read More

Shire settles whistleblower allegations of improper drug marketing for $56.5 million

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Shire Pharmaceuticals has agreed to pay the U.S. $56.5 million to settle two whistleblower lawsuits filed by former employees of the company who alleged the company illegally marketed several drugs for unapproved, off-label purposes and then billed Medicare, Medicaid, and other taxpayer-funded health care programs for them. Dublin, Ireland-based Shire operates in the U.S. out of its facility in Wayne, Penn. The company makes and markets Adderall XR, Vyvanse, and Daytrana, which are approved for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Pentasa and Lialda, which are approved for the treatment of mild to moderate ulcerative colitis. The ... Read More

Statins increase diabetes risk, but may protect against diabetes-related blood vessel damage

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Cholesterol-lowering statin medications, such as the widely prescribed Lipitor, may protect diabetics against diabetes-related damage to small blood vessels that can cause to blindness and neuropathy, which can lead to amputations, a new study suggests. However, the drugs may cause non-diabetics to develop the disease. Statins are used to lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes in people with elevated cholesterol levels. Statin side effects, which include muscle injury and liver damage, also include increased blood sugar levels, which can increase the risk for type 2 diabetes. It is this adverse event, however, that researchers focused in on for ... Read More

Panel recommends more studies on cardiovascular risks with testosterone drugs

Low T

Makers of testosterone replacement drugs should collect data on heart attacks and strokes in men who use their products, and the labels on the treatments should have stronger language to restrict intended uses to reduce over-prescribing, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel recommended. The FDA asked an outside panel of experts to address whether there is a risk of major cardiovascular events such as stroke, heart attack and death in men who used testosterone replacement therapies. The agency also asked the panel whether current evidence still supports the use of the drugs in certain patients. The FDA is ... Read More

Breast reduction third most common cosmetic surgery for men

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In 2013, nearly 23,000 procedures – including liposuction and mastectomies – were performed on men to remove enlarged breast tissue, a condition known as gynecomastia. The procedure is the third most common cosmetic surgery performed for men behind rhinoplasty (nose reshaping) and blepharoplasty (eye lift). Gynecomastia can be embarrassing leaving lingering emotional scars. It can also be painful, causing breasts to become swollen and tender. In some cases, the breasts can lactate. The condition may go away after a few months or years, or symptoms may persist for a lifetime, in which case surgical intervention may be considered. “Surgical treatment ... Read More

Newly approved type 2 diabetes drug carries black box warning for thyroid cancer risk

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Eli Lilly and Co.’s new Type 2 diabetes treatment Trulicity, but the approval comes with a black box warning about an increased risk of thyroid cancer. Trulicity is an injectable drug in a family of type 2 diabetes medications known as glucagon-like peptide-1, or GLP-1, receptors. These drugs are in class of medications known as incretin mimetics that help control blood sugar levels in patients who do not produce enough insulin. Trulicity can be used as a single treatment or in combination with other commonly prescribed diabetes drugs including metformin, Actos and ... Read More

Boston Scientific to pay $73.5 million in transvaginal mesh lawsuit

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Boston Scientific was found negligent and ordered to pay $73.5 million in damages for injuries caused by its transvaginal mesh device. Plaintiff Martha Salazar alleged she suffered nerve damage, pain and infections after having the company’s Obtryx mesh implanted in January 2011. She claims the mesh was defectively designed. Transvaginal mesh, also known as a bladder sling, is used to treat common pelvic floor disorders including pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. It is inserted through the vagina to hold up organs that have dropped over time causing pain, discomfort and incontinence. Several medical device companies manufacture transvaginal mesh ... Read More

Whistleblower claims CDC study covered up possible link between vaccines and autism, sparks controversy

Syringe - Insulin - Diabetis

Debate over the connection between childhood vaccinations and the development of autism is heating up again due to a YouTube video released Aug. 22 titled, “CDC Whistleblower Revealed.” This video includes a recorded conversation between Brian Hooker, Ph.D., a biomedical engineer, and Dr. William Thompson, a senior scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Their conversation, which Dr. Thompson was not aware was being recorded, revealed a possible omission by the CDC from a study that could link the occurrence of autism in African American boys to vaccines given before age 2. In 2004, the U.S. Government ... Read More