Personal Injury

Medical condition eyed as cause of NY milk truck crash

Authorities investigating a truck crash in upstate New York say the driver may have suffered a medical problem that caused his vehicle to careen off the highway Sunday afternoon.

According to The Citizen, a newspaper serving Cayuga County, N.Y., David Mosier, 45, was hauling thousands of gallons of milk along an upstate highway when he suddenly lost control of the vehicle, crashed through a guard rail, and rolled into a ditch on the side of the road. The crash caused about 4,000 gallons of milk and 60 gallons of diesel fuel to spill at the site.

ALYNE Trucking Company, the owner/operator of the milk truck involved in the crash, told The Citizen that Mr. Mosier was ejected from the truck as it rolled and was airlifted to a Syracuse hospital for treatment of head injuries, broken ribs, lacerations, and other more minor injuries.

Mr. Mosier, who has driven trucks for more than 20 years, was reportedly able to walk and talk hours later and is expected to make a good recovery from the crash.

Lt. Michael Wellauer of the Cayuga County Sheriff’s Department told The Citizen that he believes a medical problem is the underlying cause of the crash. According to The Citizen, “Wellauer could not specify what sort of medical problem would have caused the crash, but said there was no other apparent reason why Mosier would have gone off the straight road in clear weather.”

ALYNE said it would conduct its own internal investigation of the crash and hired a company to remove the contaminated soil from the crash site to prevent diesel fuel from seeping into the Owasco Lake Inlet.

Police haven’t issued any tickets in connection with the crash.

Although investigators did not raise the possibility that driver fatigue played a role in the crash, certain medical conditions, such as sleep apnea and other sleeping disorders, can cause excessive sleepiness and fatigue.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration maintains a public outreach to help inform companies and commercial drivers about the importance of driver wellness. For more information, go to   http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/documents/sleep-apnea/Recognizing-508.pdf.