Pharmaceutical

UFC champion says his use of testosterone replacement therapy is legal

testim UFC champion says his use of testosterone replacement therapy is legalBrazilian mixed martial artist and former Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) Light Heavyweight Champion Vitor Vieira Belfort is facing criticism of his use of testosterone replacement therapy. Many are attributing his string of first-round knockout wins to his use of testosterone drugs. However, Belfort claims the usage is legal and that his testosterone levels were actually low during his last fight. “I have the exams to prove that I have a disease. It’s simple,” he told MMAFighting.com.

Nearly 3 percent of all men in the United States older than 40 take a prescription testosterone treatment to help boost low levels of the male hormone, which can cause symptoms such as fatigue, muscle weakness, and a diminished sex drive. Use of testosterone supplements, such as the gels Testim, Androgel and Axiron, have skyrocketed in recent years, a result of heavy marketing by drug companies encouraging men to talk to their doctors about “Low T.” The drugs are recommended only for men whose blood levels show low testosterone, however there is some concern that the supplements may be prescribed to men with adequate testosterone levels.

Until recently, the long-term effects of testosterone replacement therapy have been unknown. But a new study published in the Journal of the America Medical Association (JAMA) has revealed that the hormone replacement treatment can increase a man’s risk of stroke, heart attack or death by any cause by 30 percent. Fourteen percent of men who started testosterone treatment after undergoing angiography were generally younger and slightly healthier than the 86 percent of men who did not use the hormones. However, after three years the men on testosterone therapy were nearly 30 percent more likely than those who did not take testosterone to have a stroke, heart attack or die.

Researchers also found that among the men using testosterone supplements, those who started the study with clear, unblocked arteries were just as likely to have a heart attack, stroke or die as men who entered the study with established coronary artery disease.

Researchers say the results provide more information doctors and patients can use when weighing the risks and benefits of testosterone therapy.

For more information, visit Beasley Allen’s website about the risks of testosterone replacement therapy, www.LowT-lawyer.com.

Source: Bleacher Report