Pharmaceutical

NZ residents push for ban of hernia mesh

physiomesh NZ residents push for ban of hernia meshNew Zealand’s medical authority Medsafe has banned the use of surgical mesh for gynecological procedures like pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence, effective Jan. 4, 2018. Now some residents are calling for an even wider ban of the products, arguing that similar complications can occur when the mesh is used for hernia repair and it should be banned outright.

Karyn Freer was implanted with a hernia mesh but was in so much pain that she underwent surgery to remove the mesh. She died in June 2014, while still recovering from hernia mesh removal surgery.

Mesh for hernia repair as well as gynecological repairs has been a popular option around the world. But there is growing evidence that the mesh is rife with complications, including erosion into tissue, protrusion into organs, infections and chronic pain. In some cases, such as Karyn’s, the complications can be fatal.

Injury reports in women who have undergone gynecological repairs using transvaginal mesh have prompted Medsafe to ban its use. But the agency has fallen short in banning the products for hernia repair. Karyn’s daughter, Sharleen Greer, supports Medsafe’s move for a partial ban of surgical mesh.

“It will help a lot of people, and is a massive step in the right direction, but hernia mesh still needs to be looked at properly, and included in the ban,” she said. “We’ve always thought if the mesh hadn’t been used originally on Mum, she wouldn’t have had the second operation to remove it, and so would have been with us here now. There was just no need.”

Physiomesh by Ethicon is used for hernia repair in the United States, but similar injuries have been reported in connection with the device. The company faces a growing number of lawsuits, consolidated into a multidistrict litigation in the Northern District of Georgia in Atlanta, alleging the company did not adequately warn about the risks associated with its hernia repair kit.

Source: The Southland Times