Author

Jennifer Walker-Journey

7771 posts

Jennifer Walker-Journey is a professional writer whose 20-year career spans from newspapers and magazines to Ezines and business blogs. Her primary focus is corporate and business writing, though she relishes any opportunity to write features. In her limited free time, Jennifer strives to finish the novel she is writing. She lives in Birmingham with her husband, Rick, and their insatiably curious son, Truman.

Insys founder paid kickbacks to docs to prescribe its addictive fentanyl

Insys Therapeutics Inc.’s founder and four of its executives stooped to new lows to entice doctors to prescribe their pricey opioid spray Subsys, treating them to lavish dinners, putting them on its payroll, and even giving one top prescriber of the drug a lap dance, Assistant U.S. Attorney David G. Lazarus told a federal jury in Boston in the trial of former Insys chairman and founder John Kapoor. Kapoor, along with other company executives, is facing charges of using bribes and kickbacks to increase sales of Subsys, a highly addictive spray version of the opioid fentanyl. “This is a case ... Read More

Sri Lanka halts imports of J&J talcum powders due to public health risk

The island country of Sri Lanka has halted imports of Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products until the company can prove that its talc-containing products are not contaminated with cancer-causing asbestos. The news comes just weeks after federal authorities in neighboring India collected samples of talcum powder from two India-based Johnson & Johnson facilities to test for asbestos. That inspection was initiated after a Reuters investigation uncovered documents that showed Johnson & Johnson knew for decades that the talc it used in its products contained asbestos. The company never informed federal authorities in the U.S., nor did it warn consumers ... Read More

‘Powerful’ youth volleyball coach faces sexual assault class action

An Aurora, Illinois man dubbed “the most powerful coach in youth volleyball,” by sports network ESPN is now the center of a potential multimillion-dollar class action lawsuit alleging the coach raped and sexually abused underaged players, the Cook County Record reported. The club volleyball program he was affiliated with is also named in the lawsuit for not protecting athletes from the coach. U.S. District Judge Matthew F. Kennelly, green-lighted the request from plaintiff Laura Mullen to certify the class against coach Rick Butler, the Great Lakes Volleyball Center, and Butler’s Sports Performance Volleyball Club. The class could grow into the ... Read More

Workers sue J&J for overvaluing stocks amid asbestos scandal

Johnson & Johnson employees who trusted the company with their retirement savings by investing in the company’s stock are suing the consumer health care giant. They accuse the company of overvaluing its stocks while hiding the fact that its talcum powder products contained cancer causing asbestos, according to a proposed class action complaint filed in New Jersey federal court, Law360 reported. Lead plaintiff Michael Perrone claims that J&J and some of its senior executives violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) by failing to act in the best interest of their retirement plans because they knew for decades that ... Read More

Former Vol basketball player blames benzene, radiation for leukemia diagnosis

Former Tennessee Volunteer basketball great Tony White, known to fans as “The Wizard,” was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in September and is now embarked on the fight of his life. White is considered one of the most prolific scorers in Tennessee basketball history. Former Vol teammates and Tennessee head basketball coach Rick Barnes have visited White in the hospital. “I just ask everybody that thoughts and prayers go his way. I’ve been over there a couple of times and he’s fighting,” Barnes said. White played at UT from 1983 to 1987. “The leukemia completely changed my life, and ... Read More

Helmet-less e-scooter riders at risk for TBI

More than 100 cities have electric scooter services that provide convenient transportation especially in high-traffic areas. But many riders of the two-wheeled vehicles are landing in the emergency room, often for head injuries that could have been prevented had they been wearing a helmet. According to an observational study conducted by researchers with the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), about 40 percent of e-scooter riders treated at two southern California emergency departments suffered head injuries, but only 4.4 of them wore a helmet. Equally as troubling is that researchers also found that 182 of 193 e-scooter riders they observed ... Read More

Four men accuse Bohemian Rhapsody director of sexual assault when they were teens

Four men have accused Bohemian Rhapsody director Bryan Singer of sexually assaulting them in California between 1997 and 1999, when they were underage, The Atlantic reported. Writers Alex French and Maximillian Potter spent 12 months investigating the claims of the four men, speaking to more than 50 sources about allegations of sexual assault and abuse of underage boys at lavish parties Singer threw. Singer’s attorney denies his client ever had sex with or any interest in underage men. According to the report, one of the boys, Victor Valdovinos, claims when he was 13 and working as an extra on Singer’s ... Read More

Bayer asks judge to split second Roundup bellwether into two phases

A California judge is considering splitting into two parts the second bellwether trial in a lawsuit blaming an ingredient in the weed killer Roundup for causing cancer, in the same fashion a different judge did for the first bellwether. The first phase would focus on whether the ingredient glyphosate caused the plaintiff’s cancer and, if so, the second phase proceeds to determine Bayer/Monsanto’s liability. Lawyers for Bayer AG’s unit Monsanto asked California Superior Court Judge Winifred Smith to split the trial in the case of Alva and Alberta Pilliod, a husband and wife who allege each of them developed non-Hodgkin ... Read More

Recovered opioid addict shares her struggle to come clean

Sara, 29, didn’t believe she would ever become addicted to opioids because a doctor had prescribed the medication. During treatment for a medical condition, Sara was put on a morphine drip. The drip continued throughout the duration of her hospital stay. When she left the hospital, she was given a supply of pain killers. “I didn’t realize for another year or two that I probably left the hospital that day dependent on opioid pain medication.” As the physical addiction took hold of Sara, she began to feel sick. Her tolerance to the drugs increased, and she needed more and more ... Read More

As drug companies recall heart drug valsartan, other companies hike prices

Beginning in July, Teva Pharmaceuticals and Prinston Pharmaceuticals rolled out a series of recalls on the high blood pressure and heart failure medicine valsartan after a probable carcinogen was found in the drug. Another company, unaffected by the issue, saw a rare opportunity. Alembic Pharmaceuticals rushed to hike the prices of its similar drugs anywhere from 329 percent to 469 percent. And when the same potentially cancer-causing impurity was found in another high blood pressure medication, irbesartan, Alembic hiked the price of its irbesartan, too. The tactic proved an overwhelming success for the company, which reported “massive growth” in U.S. ... Read More