Author

Jennifer Walker-Journey

7624 posts

Jennifer Walker-Journey is a professional writer whose 20-year career spans from newspapers and magazines to Ezines and business blogs. Her primary focus is corporate and business writing, though she relishes any opportunity to write features. In her limited free time, Jennifer strives to finish the novel she is writing. She lives in Birmingham with her husband, Rick, and their insatiably curious son, Truman.

MS drug linked to serious strokes, tears in arteries

Reports of rare but serious strokes and tears in the lining of the arteries in the head and neck have occurred in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) shortly after starting treatment with the drug Lemtrada (alemtuzumab), which can lead to permanent disability and even death, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned in a Safety Communication. The drug ingredient alemtuzumab was initially approved in 2001 under the brand name Campath to treat a type of cancer called B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or B-CLL. In 2014, the drug was approved under the brand name Lemtrada to treat relapsing forms of MS. ... Read More

FDA warns companies for marketing ‘unlawful’ supplements for opioid withdrawal

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned two companies for illegally selling dietary supplements that contain the unapproved antidepressant tianeptine, and for making “unproven and unlawful” claims that the products can treat opioid withdrawal symptoms, pain and anxiety. Jack B Goods Outlet Store was warned about its Tianaa Red, Tianaa White and Tianaa Green supplements. MA Labs was warned for its Vicaine supplement. The supplements pose risks to consumers for a variety of reasons. Tianeptine is not approved in the United States or the United Kingdom, as well as other countries, because it can induce euphoria and carries a risk ... Read More

Radio station pulls classic holiday song out of respect for #MeToo movement

Out of respect for the #MeToo movement and in response to listeners’ concerns, a Cleveland, Ohio, radio station will not play “Baby It’s Cold Outside,” this holiday season. The 1940s-eara song playfully recounts an exchange between a woman singing that she has to leave a man’s house (“I really can’t stay”) while he tries to persuade her not to go (“but baby it’s cold outside.”) At one point during the exchange the woman sings, “say, what’s in this drink?” While the man asks, “Can I move in closer,” and tells her, “Gosh your lips look delicious,” among other suggestive comments. ... Read More

J&J expected to fight $4.69 billion talc verdict

Johnson & Johnson is expected to ask the Missouri Circuit Court in St. Louis City to undo or, at the very least, reduce a $4.69 billion verdict awarded to 22 women who accused the company’s talcum powder of being contaminated with asbestos and causing their ovarian cancer. But the women say the verdict should stand because the “vast majority of evidence” shows the company was aware its talc-containing products were dangerous but continued to sell the product without warning consumers. The Aug. 22 verdict includes $4.14 billion in punitive damages and $550 million in compensatory damages against Johnson & Johnson’s ... Read More

Texas man files lawsuit after getting sick from romaine lettuce

The first Texas lawsuit has emerged related to the romaine lettuce scare that has sickened dozens of people in 12 states due to E. coli contamination, according to the Southeast Texas Record. Brazos County resident Joe Stratta filed a lawsuit against Beef O’Brady’s Inc., and FSC Franchise Co. LLC, on Nov. 26, in the Houston Division of the Southern District of Texas, alleging the companies manufactured and sold contaminated romaine lettuce. Stratta ate the lettuce in a Caesar salad at a Beef O’Brady’s restaurant in Crestview, Florida. Four days later, he allegedly fell ill with symptoms including “watery diarrhea and ... Read More

Infants ibuprofen recalled due to higher concentration of medicine

Bottles of over-the-counter infant ibuprofen sold at CVS, Walmart and Family Dollar have been recalled because they contain concentrations of medicine that are too high and could be dangerous to young children, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said in a news release. The recall involves three lots of Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension manufactured by Tris Pharma Inc. “There is a remote possibility that infants, who may be susceptible to a higher potency level of drug, and therefore may be more vulnerable to permanent NSAID-associated renal injury,” the agency said. Adverse events related to ingesting a higher dose of ... Read More

Kratom products laced with ‘dangerous’ amounts of heavy metals

“Disturbingly” high levels of heavy metals that can be harmful to humans, like lead and nickel, have been found in more than two dozen different kratom products, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned. “While the levels of the specific products we’ve tested so far are not likely to result in immediate acute heavy metal poisoning from a single use, some of these products included levels that, with chronic use, could cause some people to suffer heavy metal poisoning,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., said in a statement. The agency tested 26 different kratom products, and is concerned that there ... Read More

Colbert blames Purdue Pharma and its owners for worsening opioid epidemic

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert took a swipe at the family behind Big Pharma giant Purdue Pharma, blaming the company and its owners for what he described as its ruthless plan to increase profits by increasing the number of opioid addicts around the world. Colbert calls the opioid epidemic a problem that affects both political parties. “It does not discriminate,” he said. “And a lot of people blame big pharma. But only because it’s their fault.” National Safety Council reported that 80 percent of new heroin users started on the illicit drug after misusing prescription pain killers. It was ... Read More

Black box data reveals pilots struggled to keep jet from going into nosedive

Pilots of the Boeing 737 that crashed into the Java Sea in October fought relentlessly almost from the moment the plane took off to keep the plane from taking a nosedive, but apparently the automatic system was receiving incorrect sensor readings and as a result repeatedly forced the nose down, according to a preliminary report of the plane’s black box data recorder. More than two dozen times during the 11-minute flight, pilots of the ill-fated Lion Air Flight 610 were able to force the nose of the plane back until they finally lost control, causing the plane to plummet into the ... Read More

Investigation to seek answers into construction worker’s death

Questions are circulating after a construction worker – on the job with two of his sons – was crushed to death by falling debris on a Brooklyn, New York job site. “I saw that he was dying,” said Pierre Paredes, the son of the deceased, Over Paredes, 44. “This could have been avoided.” Pierre Paredes and his brother were working with their father at a Brooklyn job site the day before Thanksgiving. According to an investigation by the Department of Buildings, Over Paredes was on the roof of the building when a wall panel carried by a fork lift tipped ... Read More