Author

Jennifer Walker-Journey

7474 posts

Jennifer Walker-Journey is a professional writer whose 20-year career spans from newspapers and magazines to Ezines and business blogs. Her primary focus is corporate and business writing, though she relishes any opportunity to write features. In her limited free time, Jennifer strives to finish the novel she is writing. She lives in Birmingham with her husband, Rick, and their insatiably curious son, Truman.

Abuse-deterrent OxyContin may have contributed to rise in hepatitis C

When the first abuse-deterrent formulation of the opioid OxyContin was introduced in 2010 as a way to deter misuse of the drug, it may have set off an increase in hepatitis C infections by pushing users toward injectable heroin, a new study suggests. Acute hepatitis C infections in the United States were declining in the 1990s and plateaued around 2003. But beginning in 2010, rates have been rising. Researchers with RAND Corporation told Medscape Medical News that while hepatitis C infection rates rose nationwide after abuse-deterrent OxyContin was introduced, states with higher rates of OxyContin misuse prior to the reformulation ... Read More

MA nursing home agrees to pay $1 million to settle wrongful death lawsuit

A Westborough, Massachusetts, nursing home has agreed to pay $1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit brought by the daughter of an elderly woman who died from injuries sustained after falling at the facility. Candilou C. Hitchcock filed the lawsuit in Worcester Superior Court in 2017. Her mother, Betty “Betsy” Ford Crane, 89, was living at Beaumont Rehabilitation & Skilled Nursing Center when, on July 29, 2015, she fell, suffering blunt force head trauma. She died a week later on Aug. 7, 2015. Crane suffered from dementia and had fallen at least 21 other times while at the facility. ... Read More

Campaign offers support for military male sexual assault victims

Sexual assault can happen to men, too, and the Department of Defense (DOD) wants men to know that they will be supported if they come forward. Only about 10 percent of male victims report sexual abuse, according to a survey conducted by the DOD. What keeps them silent is fear they won’t be believed or will be blamed if they report an incident. The same study also found that men who experience sexual assault do not actually see it as “sexual” as much as a cultural norm. But the DOD’s Air Force and Sexual Assault Prevention Response teams are committed ... Read More

Firing range faces steep fines for exposing workers to lead hazards

Tap Rack Bang Indoor Shooting Range LLC in Killeen, Texas, faces up to $214,387 in penalties by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for exposing workers to unsafe levels of lead. OSHA investigated the firing range, which does business in Killeen as The Gun Range, after receiving a complaint of worker exposure to lead during firing range activities. During its inspection, OSHA officials found airborne lead exceeding the permissible exposure limit, and lead contamination throughout the facility. The company was cited for failing to replace damaged personal protective equipment, not medically monitoring employees for lead-related illnesses; and for sweeping ... Read More

Companies hit with $18 million verdict for exposing mechanic to asbestos

An Arkansas federal jury awarded a deceased mechanic’s son $18 million after finding that Honeywell International, among other parties, were responsible for causing his father’s fatal mesothelioma, Law360 reports. Ronald Burlie Thomas filed a lawsuit against 11 companies including Honeywell and Ford Motor Company. He died at the age of 72 in December 2017. Following Mr. Thomas’ death, his son, Michael Lyn Thomas, stepped in as the plaintiff. Ronald Thomas claimed that he was exposed to asbestos in materials he used while working as a mechanic. Honeywell’s predecessor, Bendix Corp., made the brakes that the jury determined were the source ... Read More

Experimental compound effective for some relapsing AML cases

Purdue University researchers are developing a series of drug compounds to treat recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive and deadly blood cancer. About 19,520 people are diagnosed with AML each year, and about 10,670 die from it, according to the American Cancer Society. About 30 percent of AML patients have an FLT3 enzyme mutation that makes the disease more aggressive. Patients treated with new drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) – Radapt and Gilteritinib, both FLT3 inhibitors – have shown good initial response to treating leukemia. But AML patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors often relapse ... Read More

OSU faces two lawsuits over alleged sexual abuse by former wrestling coach

Former wrestling students at Ohio State University have filed two separate class-action lawsuits alleging the university ignored allegations of sexual abuse against them. The first lawsuit, filed by four “John Does” and wrestling team members, allege that the team doctor, Dr. Richard Strauss, “sexually assaulted, battered, molested, and/or harassed,” them during medical exams performed from the late 1980s through the 1990s. Strauss committed suicide in 2005. The men claim in their lawsuit that their complaints “were not left unreported at the level of the coaches,” and that “rampant sexual abuse and culture of sexual abuse was reported to Ohio State ... Read More

Recalls cause shortage of high blood pressure drugs

Sweeping recalls of a class of high blood pressure drugs known as ARBs, or angiotensin II receptor blockers, has resulted in a shortage, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb and FDA director of drug evaluation and research Dr. Janet Woodcock said in a joint statement. And the problem will probably get worse. The shortage is among ARBs that contain the active drug ingredient valsartan, and may soon also affect other ARBs that contain losartan and irbesartan. The shortage is due to recalls of the drug over an unexpected impurity, which was identified as a chemical called NDMA ... Read More

One dead, two injured after wall collapses at construction site

The general contractor overseeing a construction site in Raleigh, North Carolina, where a man was killed and two others were injured, had a history of safety violations, according to an investigation by WRAL. Harold K. Jordan & Co. (HKJ) was overseeing the construction of a 382-unit apartment complex at Old Wake Forest Road and Triangle Town Boulevard when a portion of an excavated area collapsed, burying three workers. Other workers were able to dig the two injured workers to safety, but were unable to rescue the third. “It was quickly apparent they were not able to do anything to save ... Read More

Jurors told J&J knew its talc could cause lung diseases, asphyxiate babies

The medical community has known since 1922 that inhaling talcum powder can lead to the lung disease talcosis and could even asphyxiate babies, yet Johnson & Johnson never warned consumers of its other talc-containing products of this risk. Instead, even after learning that asbestos was found in the talc it used, the company marketed its talcum products as “pure,” even adding fragrances to make the products more attractive to buyers, an epidemiologist testified to California jurors in the case of a woman suing J&J. Dr. David S. Egilman told jurors that his opinions are based on an analysis of the ... Read More