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ATV safety questioned after fatal accident in Alabama

An ATV accident in Russell County, Ala., turned fatal this weekend. Two boys, both age 13, were involved in the accident, and one was killed. Both boys were three years younger than the age suggested for ATV operation, 16. Careless driving is believed to have contributed to the accident. According to WSFA, Alabama State Trooper Zachary Harrelson said the driver of the ATV “failed to yield to the ‘Game and Fish’ vehicle and was subsequently struck by the ‘Game and Fish’ vehicle.” The news report cites statistics from the Alabama Department of Public Safety that say in 2007, 121 ATV ... Read More

Pre-emption could give Bayer an escape from Trasylol case

Zero accountability for drug companies? Bloomberg recently ran an article about pharmaceutical companies enjoying their “get out of jail free cards” — revisions to regulations that favor the rights of pharmaceutical companies over consumers who use their drugs. The revised regulations, written just after George W. Bush’s second inauguration in 2005, allow federal law to trump state law, thereby clearing the path for drug manufacturers to develop, test, market, and essentially do business with impunity from the law. Think corporate Utopia. Think David vs. Goliath where Goliath enjoys a major handicap. According to the U.S. Constitution, any decision to pre-empt ... Read More

Investigations of Vytorin marketing intensifying

Controversy surrounding the cholesterol-fighting drug Vytorin continues to escalate as federal and state prosecutors investigate Merck and Schering-Plough’s marketing of the drug. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, many government officials suspect that the companies’ marketing of Vytorin was misleading and improper. If Vytorin ad campaigns and promotional media were based on a false or misleading premise, and the drug isn’t all its manufacturers publicized it to be (as the drug trials suggest), then government programs spent millions of dollars on reimbursement for a drug that is ineffective, possibly dangerous, and much more expensive than generic cholesterol ... Read More

Faulty mechanical lift blamed for nursing home resident death

The Ontario, Canada coroner’s office blames a malfunctioning lifting device for the death of a 67-year-old Toronto nursing home resident, according to The (Toronto) Star. The LIKO 102EE mechanically lifting device is used to transfer people with limited mobility from a bed to a wheelchair. LIKO lifts are widely used in Canada and the United States. To date, there have been 12 reports of the LIKO lifts malfunctioning in the U.S. since 2005. The deceased, Wally Baker, was a resident of Leisureworld Caregiving Centre (O’Connor Gate) in Toronto. He had fallen from the lift at the nursing home on April ... Read More

Male hormone increases sex drive, cancer risk questionable

Postmenopausal women who experience a slump in their sex drive may rediscover their libido by taking the male sex hormone testosterone. However, researchers are unsure if there may be a link between the use of testosterone and breast cancer, according to FoodConsumer.org. During menopause, sex drive can drop to very low levels, which some believe may be a result of lowered levels of estrogen, progesterone and testosterone in the body during menopause. Estrogen helps you to feel heightened sensitivity during sexual intercourse. Progesterone keeps your libido up. Testosterone boosts sexual desire and lubricates the vagina. For relief from menopausal symptoms, ... Read More

Bonuses paid to nursing homes with no regard to quality care

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is paying millions of dollars in taxpayer money each year to nursing homes, some of which have been cited for below-average care, according to a report by the Des Moines (Iowa) Register. The monies come from bonuses paid to nursing homes for following programs that in many cases are legally required, such as paying minimum wages and installing fire sprinklers for resident safety. The Des Moines Register reviewed 81 bonus payment programs in 36 different states. Iowa, which began participating in the bonus program six years ago, was one of the first to ... Read More

Scientists develop heparin antagonist medication

Scientists in Poland are developing a new way to remove heparin from blood in order to reduce or avoid the occurrence of unwanted side effects, according to Science Centric. Heparin is routinely used before certain types of surgery or other procedures are preformed to prevent clotting. Afterward, doctors will often remove the blood thinner to avoid unwanted bleeding by using the medication protamine. Protamine is a weak anticoagulant drug that is administered intravenously and acts as a heparin antagonist. But protamine carries a risk of serious side effects such as difficulty breathing; swelling of the mouth, face, lips or tongue; ... Read More

The pump that doesn’t ease the pain

Through arthroscopic shoulder surgery, patients hope for better use of their shoulder and to put an end to their shoulder pain. The expectations of the surgery include alleviating patients’ shoulder problems, and for their post-surgical pain to be eased through pain pumps. While the problems initially might have been alleviated through surgery, it was the pump to ease the pain after the surgery that brought the patients back with more pain and suffering than before.When patients reported back to their doctors after surgery, the same stories in numerous cases were reported, citing a loss of cartilage, and chronic pain. According ... Read More

Parents of Tenn. girl injured in Rhino rollover sue Yamaha

Greg and Theresa Mitchell of Clarksville, Tennessee have filed a personal injury lawsuit against Yamaha Motor Corporation for injuries that their 11-year-old daughter sustained when the Yamaha Rhino ATV she was riding in rolled over. The Mitchells’ daughter was a passenger in the Rhino ATV when it rolled over onto the passenger side. The June 2005 accident occurred while the ATV was being driven soundly, leading the Mitchells to allege that the Yamaha Rhino is dangerously unstable and defective. Like many people throughout the country, the Mitchells suggest the accident would not have occurred if Yamaha had set higher standards ... Read More

Zero accountability for drug companies?

Bloomberg recently ran an interesting and comprehensive article about pharmaceutical companies enjoying their “get out of jail free cards” — revisions to regulations that favor the rights of pharmaceutical companies over consumers who use their drugs. The revised regulations, written just after George W. Bush’s inauguration in 2005, allow federal law to trump (or pre-empt) state law, thereby clearing the path for drug manufacturers to develop, test, market, and essentially do business with impunity from the law. Think corporate Utopia. Think David vs. Goliath where Goliath enjoys a major handicap. According to the U.S. Constitution, any decision to pre-empt state ... Read More