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E-Cigarette Batteries Blamed for Two Canadian Airplane Incidents

E-cigarette batteries were the cause of two recent fires involving Canadian airliners, including one in-flight fire in the cargo hold of a passenger jet. Canadian authorities said the latest fire occurred in Cancun, Mexico, on Jan. 12 as baggage was being loaded onto Air Transat flight 443. According to FlightGobal, a preliminary aviation incident report by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) said that “brown smoke could be seen coming” from one piece of luggage being loaded onto the Vancouver-bound Airbus A321. The report stated that the smoking suitcase was removed from the gate area and doused with a ... Read More

Blogger fights back against sexual harassment with #OutThem campaign

Kristina Kuzmic has developed a platform with her in-your-face, “mom-centric” videos about raising children. Her blogs and videos garner thousands of comments. But sometimes social media can be a platform for sexual harassment. Kristina recently shared a few unwelcome comments she has received from men amid the rising tide of the #MeToo movement: “I want to pin you down and — the — out of you.” “Shut your mouth and open your legs and maybe I could teach you a few things.” “I want to choke you a little but in a fun way, if you know what I mean.” ... Read More

Perdue’s Sackler family blamed addicts for opioid epidemic

In 1996, Purdue Pharma held a launch party to introduce its new, potent opioid called OxyContin. Then-senior vice president Richard Sackler made a prediction that the party “will be followed by a blizzard of prescriptions that will bury the competition.” Not only was Sackler right, OxyContin became “one of the deadliest drugs of all time,” according to Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey in an amended lawsuit filed against the company. Over the next 20 years since the drug’s launch, Richard Sackler became CEO of Purdue. With family members Beverly, David, Ilene, Lefcourt, Jonathan, Kathe, Mortimer, and Theresa sitting on the ... Read More

Bayer’s Roundup woes are becoming toxic

Bayer AG continues to fight claims that glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s weed killer Roundup, causes cancer. But one thing not up for debate: Bayer’s acquisition of Monsanto last June has been toxic to the German multinational company. According to Spiegel Online, Bayer is desperately working to salvage its business by selling off business divisions and laying off employees. Bayer AG’s leader, Bayer CEO Werner Baumann stands by his company’s decision to buy the agribusiness giant, saying he would buy it again “without any ifs, ands or buts.” The herbicide has been around since the 1970s and is the ... Read More

Mass opioid overdose leaves 1 dead, 12 hospitalized

One person died and a dozen were hospitalized after a mass opioid overdose at a home in Chino, California. Two officers at the scene also required medical treatment because of accidental exposure to the dangerous drug. Police say the likely culprit was fentanyl and another substance that has not yet been identified. Chino Fire Department Division Chief Jesse Alexander said at one point he saw CPR being performed on six people at the same time during the mass casualty incident. Six doses of the opioid reversal agent Naloxone were also administered, Chino Police Chief Michael O’Brien said. Chino police officers ... Read More

French journalist calls glyphosate ‘most toxic product ever invented by man’

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s weed killer Roundup, is “The most toxic product ever invented by man,” French TV journalist and documentary filmmaker Marie-Monique Robin told France24. The producer of the award winning 2008 documentary The World According to Monsanto made the assertion this week, during the same month that France’s ban on weed killers in household gardens across the country goes into effect. The ban prohibits households from stocking or using the chemical compounds due to the danger they pose to the environment. However, industrial use is still permitted. Monsanto introduced glyphosate in the herbicide Roundup in 1974. Years later, ... Read More

Scientists finds talc in dying woman’s lung tissue

Cell biologist and retired academic Ronald F. Dodson told a California jury that samples of lung tissue from a woman dying from mesothelioma contained talc, and he believed that it came from the woman’s once-daily and heavy use of Johnson’s Baby Powder. He said, based on plaintiff Teresa E. Leavitt’s sworn statement about her use of Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder, her lungs “would be the logical place where you would expect to find talc.” Dodson gave the testimony during the latest trial against Johnson & Johnson blaming its talc-containing products for causing mesothelioma, a rare but deadly form of ... Read More

NTSB Investigations Frozen During Government Shutdown

Dozens of major transportation accidents are going uninvestigated and others are being skipped entirely as the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) remains almost completely furloughed during the government shutdown. Approximately 93 percent of the NTSB’s 397 employees are furloughed during the government shutdown, leaving just five investigators and a few support staff to keep key investigations afloat. Government documents obtained by CBS News show how the shutdown has prevented the NTSB from launching 74 accident investigations, including probes of 20 accidents resulting in 34 deaths and 18 injuries. Twelve of the transportation accidents going uninvestigated involve airplane crashes that resulted in ... Read More

Increase in opioid prescriptions to pets raise red flags amid national epidemic

The number of opioid prescriptions written by veterinarians for pets has increased 41 percent in the past 10 years, according to a new study by Penn Medicine and Penn Vet, raising concerns that some of the highly addictive drugs may not be going to the pets, but to their owners instead. “As we are seeing the opioid epidemic press on, we are identifying other avenues of possible human consumption and misuse,” senior study author Jeanmarie Perrone, director of medical toxicology at Penn Medicine, told The Inquirer. “Even where the increase in prescribed veterinary opioids is well intended by the veterinarian, ... Read More

Government shutdown puts fatal plane crash investigation on hold

An initial investigation into a plane crash that killed two Apple Creek, Ohio, men this week found that engine issues may have caused the crash, but the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), generally tasked with investigating and determining the probable cause of civil aviation accidents in the U.S., won’t be able to investigate the incident until the partial government shutdown is over and the agency’s investigators return to work. The accident, which occurred Jan. 21, involved a 32-seat, two-engine 1942 Douglas DC-3 cargo plane. Both the pilot, Brian L. Stoltzfus, and co-pilot, Curtis R. Wilkerson, died in the crash shortly ... Read More