Latest News

Savannah man killed in work-related accident

A City of Savannah, Georgia man was killed when a piece of heavy equipment ran him over, Savannah police reported. City Manager Rob Hernandez listed the incident as a work-related accident. The deceased, Peter Solomon, 62, was an employee for the Public Works and Water Resources. The incident remains under investigation. According to a preliminary report, a person who witnessed the accident said Solomon was pressure washing a motor grader, which is a construction machine with a long blade used to create a flat surface during the grading process. The grader started to move and then rolled over Solomon. The ... Read More

Fatal Commercial Vehicle Crashes Continue to Rise

Fatal crashes involving large commercial vehicles are on the rise in the U.S., with work-zone accidents and crashes resulting in vehicle occupant deaths showing an alarming upward trend, according to safety data reported by federal regulators. Jack Van Steenburg, chief safety officer for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) reported the grim numbers at a Jan. 15 session of the 2019 Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting. According to Transportation Topics, Mr. Van Steenburg said the number of people killed in fatal crashes involving large commercial vehicles was up to 5,005 in 2017, the latest year for which figures are ... Read More

Roundup chemical glyphosate found in California wines

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s herbicide Roundup that was recently blamed for causing a school groundskeeper’s terminal cancer, was found in a sampling of California wines. Roundup was introduced in 1974 and has since been used liberally on crops around the world, including California. As a result, traces of the herbicide have been found in cereals, granola bars, instant oats and other breakfast products. Many wine producers in California also use the weed killer on their grapes, so the presence of glyphosate in wine is not out of the question. Microbe Infotech Lab of St. Louis, Missouri tested a ... Read More

J&J paid for studies to dispel data linking talc to cancer, respiratory disease

Nearly 50 years ago, Johnson & Johnson became aware that a growing number of talc miners were more likely to be diagnosed with lung disease and cancer, suggesting a potential safety risk to consumers who used talcum powder products. The company actively worked to counter the data, according to a Reuters investigation. Johnson & Johnson’s applied research director, in a “strictly confidential” memo addressing studies that questioned the safety of talc, wrote to managers of the company’s signature talc-containing product – Johnson’s Baby Powder – its strategic plan: “we minimize the risk of possible self-generation of scientific data which may ... Read More

Atmos Energy Seeks Rate Hike in Wake of Deadly Gas Explosion

A year after a gas explosion destroyed a Dallas, Texas home, killing a 12-year-old girl and injuring four others, utility owner Atmos Energy is seeking a rate hike that would allow it to pull in an additional $10.1 million. The proposed rate hike, filed Jan. 15 in Dallas City Hall, comes as Atmos Energy continues to replace pipes in the northwest Dallas neighborhood where three gas explosions erupted on Feb. 22 and Feb. 23 of last year. Investigators say the explosion that killed 12-year-old Linda Rogers on Feb. 23 could be linked to faulty compression couplings that can separate when ... Read More

Experimental smart phone app detects opioid overdose

University of Washington (UW) researchers have developed a cellphone app designed to detect when a person is overdosing from opioids and contact someone with naloxone to intervene. The app is intended to save people from opioid overdose, an epidemic that kills about 115 people each day. “We’re experiencing an unprecedented epidemic of deaths from opioid use, and it’s unfortunate because these overdoses are completely reversible phenomena if they’re detected in time,” said Dr. Jacob Sunshine, an assistant professor of anesthesiology and pain medicine at UW School of Medicine. The Second Chance app uses an algorithm that allows smart phones to ... Read More

Asbestos lawsuit moves forward against Ford, Cummins

A deceased man’s case against Ford Motor Co. and Cummins Inc., alleging he developed mesothelioma after being exposed to the companies’ asbestos-containing products will proceed despite an attempt by both companies to dismiss the case, according to Law360. U.S. District Judge Sara S. Vance allowed the case of Victor Michel to move forward after hearing arguments by the companies that she should dismiss it. Michel filed the lawsuit prior to his death in June 2018. His family is now representing the case. Ford and Cummins had sought to exclude all of the experts Michel’s family’s intended to use, which was ... Read More

Worker decapitated by helicopter blade

A man working to jumpstart a helicopter at the Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport in Florida, “died almost immediately,” after being struck in the head by the helicopter’s spinning blade, according to the Hernando County Sheriff’s Office. The accident occurred around 3:35 p.m. on Jan. 10. Salvatore Disi, 62, and another man were working near the hangars of the airport to jumpstart a 1993 Bell 230 twin-engine light helicopter, when unexpectedly the spinning rotor blades of the aircraft “suddenly jerked up and then came down.” The blades struck Disi in the head, decapitating him. Fire and rescue workers were initially called ... Read More

United Airlines Flight Stranded in Canada with Broken Door

A medical emergency forced a United Airlines flight to land in remote Newfoundland, Canada, Saturday, but it was a broken door that left the passengers and crew stranded in frigid temperatures for more than 15 hours. United Airlines Flight 179 departed from New Jersey’s Newark Liberty International Airport Saturday afternoon bound for Hong Kong but was diverted to a Canadian military base in Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, so a passenger aboard the aircraft could receive medical treatment. According to CNN, the plane landed in Goose Bay at 9:31 p.m. Medical personnel met the aircraft and transported a passenger to ... Read More

Comatose nursing home patient may have suffered during childbirth

The woman in a decade-long persistent vegetative state who gave birth to a healthy baby boy last month to the surprise of her family and the staff at the Phoenix, Arizona nursing home where she lived, may have suffered great pain during labor and delivery, a maternal fetal medicine expert told CNN. “I can tell you that to go through labor and deliver a baby with absolutely no analgesic is difficult, but I can’t speculate as to what this patient felt, if she felt any pain, if she knew it was happening,” said Dr. Deborah Feldman, director of maternal fetal ... Read More