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C.R. Bard 120 articles

Study Finds IVC Filters may Not Meet Safety and Effectiveness Criteria

In a recent study testing the safety and effectiveness of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters used to protect against pulmonary embolism (PE), researchers have concluded that the device fell short of criteria required to deem the device safe and effective. A pulmonary embolism is a severe condition that is often fatal. It occurs when a blood clot forms in a lower extremity and embolizes to the heart or lungs. Anticoagulation medication is used for treatment of recurrent embolism, but not all patients can tolerate the drugs. A vena cava filter is often used in place of anticoagulation medication. It is a ... Read More

Two Florida Patients Are First to Receive Angel Catheter

Two patients at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, Florida have been the first to receive the Angel Catheter by Bio2 Medical. The Angel Catheter is a brand new product used for the prevention of pulmonary embolism. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the device a 510 (k) clearance. The device is mainly for critically ill patients that cannot tolerate anticoagulation medication. The Angel Catheter is a device that is inserted into the inferior vena cava, the largest vein in the body, and is attached to a triple lumen, central venous access catheter placed at the bedside of ... Read More

Increase of IVC Filter Use is Due to Trends, Societal Recommendations, Study Finds

A study published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery found that the use of IVC filters increased by 350 percent between January 1998 and January 2008, primarily due to the release of statements in favor of IVC filter use. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of societal guidelines on vena cava filter use at a national level, taking into consideration the marketing trends. After the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma released a favorable consensus in July 2002, IVC filter use jumped by 138 percent. When the Society of Interventional Radiology did the same in March 2006, the filter use increased again by 122 percent. ... Read More

Doctors Say Quebec Patient’s Temporary IVC Filter Can’t Be Removed

Recently, Health Canada issued a warning over inferior vena cava (IVC) blood clot filters that are inserted into the inferior vena cava, the largest vein in the body. The IVC filters are designed to catch blood clots, but have been known to migrate, tilt, perforate the vein and other organs, and fracture, causing metal wires to work their way through the bodies of patients. John Boehmer, a Gatineau, Quebec, resident, had a temporary IVC filter inserted following a surgical procedure. Eight months later, surgeons attempted to remove the filter, but failed after they discovered it was lodged in the wall of his vein. ... Read More

Health Canada Issues Warning Over IVC Filters

As of June 26, there have been 121 serious incidents reported to Health Canada involving inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. It’s a device that closely resembles a spider that is inserted into the largest vein in the body, intended to catch blood clots before they enter the heart and lungs. An IVC filter is often used in a patient that cannot tolerate anticoagulation medications. The device, however, is considered controversial in Canada because of the “serious complications” that have been reported in so many patients, such as the filter migrating, tilting, fracturing or perforating veins and organs. For this reason, hundreds ... Read More

Lawsuit alleges New-and-Improved IVC Filter Injured Texas Woman

An inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a device closely resembling a spider that is inserted into the inferior vena cava, the largest vein in the body. Its purpose is to catch blood clots and prevent them from reaching the heart or lungs. Patients who can’t tolerate anticoagulation medication are often implanted with IVC filters as a means to prevent pulmonary embolism. The retrievable IVC filter models are intended to be temporary, and according to the FDA should be retrieved between 29 and 54 days after insertion. C.R. Bard, a medical device manufacturing giant, has been under fire recently for problems reported in ... Read More

Lawsuit alleges IVC filter breakage resulted in potentially life-threatening internal injuries

Joan Wiseman, a resident of California, filed a complaint in August against Cook Medical alleging the company’s retrievable IVC filter is a “defective medical device” that caused her internal injuries that could have been life-threatening. An IVC filter is a cage-like device implanted in the inferior vena cava, the largest vein in the body. Its purpose is to catch blood clots, preventing them from reaching the heart or lungs, particularly in patients that cannot take anticoagulation medication. Wiseman claims that the device used was defective. It was a Celect IVC filter, made by Cook, which has been under fire recently with more than 800 federal lawsuits in a Multi-District Litigation (MDL) alleging IVC ... Read More

Texas Man Files Lawsuit Against IVC Filter Manufacturer

In September of 2011, Steven Akin was implanted with an Option IVC filter at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. But in May of 2016, when he began experiencing back pain, Akin sought medical help from Dr. Omar Colon, who ordered an X-ray. Upon examination, Dr. Colon discovered that the IVC filter was deeply embedded in the inferior vena cava. Because of its position, the filter could not be removed without tearing the vein. The inferior vena cava is the largest vein in the body, and an IVC filter is a cage-like device implanted in that vein. Its purpose is to catch blood clots, ... Read More

Nearly 1,500 Lawsuits Filed in Federal Court Against Makers of IVC Filters

According to updated statistics released last week by the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multi-District Litigation, nearly 1,500 lawsuits have been filed in federal court against makers of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. An IVC filter is a cage-like device that is implanted in the largest vein of the body. Its purpose is to catch blood clots, preventing them from reaching the heart or lungs, particularly in patients that cannot take anticoagulation medication. Retrievable IVC filters are meant to be temporary, and the FDA recommends retrieval between 29 and 54 days after insertion. However, the filters have a tendency to fracture, tilt, perforate the vena cava wall ... Read More

Lawsuits Against C.R. Bard for allegedly Faulty Retrievable IVC Filters Converge in Phoenix

A federal judge in Phoenix has been appointed to oversee an upwards of 400 cases in a multidistrict litigation (MDL) in which patients claim C.R. Bard manufactured a defective product with the retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. IVC filters are cage-like devices that are implanted in the largest vein of the body. Their purpose is to catch blood clots, preventing them from reaching the heart or lungs, particularly in patients that cannot take anticoagulation medication. Retrievable IVC filters are meant to be temporary, and the FDA recommends retrieval between 29 and 54 days after insertion. Bard’s retrievable filters are the Recovery, G2 and G2 Express. ... Read More