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DNA damage 17 articles

Researchers aim to understand the potential harm in nanoparticles

When a mineral is broken down into smaller and smaller particles, or nanoparticles, its biological makeup can be affected, turning a seemingly harmless mineral into a potential lethal threat. Understanding which minerals’ nanoparticles pose risks is the work of a group of researchers at Northwest Nazarene University. Chemistry professor Jerry Harris refers to the book, “Asbestos: Silk of the Mineral Kingdom,” which was published in 1946 and touted the benefits of abestos. Asbestos became widely used in the United States throughout the 20th century as insulation because of its affordability and sound absorption. What researchers didn’t learn until decades later ... Read More

Family says defective metal-on-metal hip implant caused mother’s brain cancer

A woman who had filed a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson for its defective metal-on-metal hip implant has died of an aggressive brain cancer, a disease her family believes was caused by blood poisoning from her corroding artificial hip. Bharucha had broken a hip when she suffered a fall and in 2007 was fitted with Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy ASR hip replacement system. The surgery did not relieve her pain or help her regain her mobility. In fact, she grew increasingly worse. By 2011, a year after the device was recalled due to premature failures, Bharucha had revision surgery to ... Read More

Researchers find metal ion concentration, device brand may predict hip implant failure

The amount of metal ions in the blood and the type of hip implant may predict premature failure of metal-on-metal hip replacements, according to a team of United Kingdom researchers. Researchers reviewed data from 299 resurfacing procedures in 278 patients with various brands of hip implants. The patients had reported complications that were likely related to high levels of metal in their blood. Patients were put through a blood metal ion screening protocol, ultrasound scanning, and joint aspiration to determine the level of cobalt concentration. Researchers found that blood-cobalt concentration and the type of device used were significant risk factors ... Read More

Stryker to pay up to $1.1 billion to resolve metal hip lawsuits

Medical device maker Stryker Corp. says it expects to pay up to $1.1 billion to settle personal injury lawsuits stemming from a 2012 recall of two of the company’s metal hip implants. The amount is more than twice what the company previously estimated it would have to pay to resolve the lawsuits. In July 2012, Stryker recalled its Rejuvenate and ABG II modular-neck stems because of concerns that the devices could fret or corrode inside the body, which could damage surrounding tissue and cause pain and inflammation. Last July the company in a securities filing said it estimated the costs ... Read More

Researchers: More studies needed to determine long-term cancer risk with all-metal hip implants

Researchers are recommending long-term studies be done on patients with metal-on-metal hip replacement systems to determine whether corroding implants cause cancer. The recommendation was made following a study in which researchers found no increase in cancer in a seven-year period in people with all-metal hip implants. Traditional hip implants are made with plastic or ceramic parts, but in the past decade many manufacturers of these medical devices began making the devices with all metal parts. The metal hips were thought to be more durable and thus ideal for younger and more active patients. However, they devices were found to fail prematurely ... Read More

Many more revision surgeries occur in patients with all-metal hip implants

Nearly 75 percent of revision surgeries to remove and replace a hip replacement within five years of initial implantation occur in patients who received a metal-on-metal device, according to a Canadian study. Researchers pored through data involving 60,000 hip replacements performed across Canada between 2003 and 2011. They found that the need for revision surgery was greater in patients who had large-diameter modular metal-on-metal implants compared to patients who had more common plastic devices. Traditional hip replacement systems are made with ceramic or plastic parts, and can last 20 years or more before needing to be replaced. In the past ... Read More

Researchers find that common antibiotics can damage DNA

Antibiotics have long been praised for wiping out bacterial infections with few side effects. But, for years, researchers have raised concerns that antibiotics were being over prescribed and overused in many cases for conditions for which they provide no benefit. The concerns seem to have fallen on deaf ears, as a fifth of doctor’s office visits in the United States results in a prescription for antibiotics, and every child receives an average of one antibiotic prescription per year. A new study raises yet another red flag over antibiotics – it indicates they can damage DNA. Researchers conducted studies on human ... Read More

Chicago woman sues manufacturer of metal hip replacement system

A Chicago woman is suing the maker of her all-metal hip replacement system that she claims corroded in her body triggering the growth of a football-sized tumor-like growth in her hip joint. Diana Jaras was one of about 20,000 people in the United States who were fitted with a rejuvenate or ABG2 modular hip replacement system made by Stryker Medical Devices. The implant features a titanium stem that attaches to a cobalt neck. The devices were designed to be more durable than traditional ceramic or plastic implants, however, it has since been found that metal-on-metal hip implants have a serious ... Read More

Researchers unsure how to evaluate metal ion levels in patients with metal-on-metal hip implants

Blood tests to measure the amount of metal ions in the blood of patients with metal-on-metal hip implants are inexpensive and provide helpful information. But they do not provide definitive information whether an artificial hip is functioning poorly and is likely to fail, new research shows. Chromium and cobalt ion levels are generally elevated in the blood of patients with all-metal hip implants. Because the implants have been found more likely to fail than traditional hip implants, medical regulators say that patients with the devices should be monitored on a regular basis for signs of failure. That monitoring generally includes a ... Read More

DePuy’s tests on metal artificial hip system failed to show potential dangers of device

Orthopedic doctors were optimistic when metal-on-metal hip replacement systems were first introduced around the world. They offered a seemingly more durable alternative to traditional ceramic or plastic artificial hips. The devices were especially attractive to younger recipients, who wanted to go back to a more active lifestyle. DePuy Orthopaedics, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, introduced the DePuy ASR metal-on-metal hip replacement system and hip resurfacing system. The hip replacement system was quickly approved in the United States without prior human testing because it was similar to devices already on the market. However, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) refused to ... Read More