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hemorrhaging 38 articles

Boston Scientific to pay $73.5 million in transvaginal mesh lawsuit

Boston Scientific was found negligent and ordered to pay $73.5 million in damages for injuries caused by its transvaginal mesh device. Plaintiff Martha Salazar alleged she suffered nerve damage, pain and infections after having the company’s Obtryx mesh implanted in January 2011. She claims the mesh was defectively designed. Transvaginal mesh, also known as a bladder sling, is used to treat common pelvic floor disorders including pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. It is inserted through the vagina to hold up organs that have dropped over time causing pain, discomfort and incontinence. Several medical device companies manufacture transvaginal mesh ... Read More

Physicians groups recommend six-step evaluation before women undergo bladder sling surgery

Physicians do not need to perform preoperative urodynamic testing, or bladder test functioning, on patients with uncomplicated stress urinary incontinence (SUI) before having surgery to implant a bladder sling to treat symptoms because doing so does not improve surgical outcomes, according to first-time guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Urogynecologic Society. Instead, the two medical groups recommend that physicians perform a basic six-step evaluation on women with uncomplicated SUI. This is the first time guidelines have been established to provide consistency in the evaluation of uncomplicated SUI, setting standards for physicians before they operate ... Read More

Maine woman sues makers of transvaginal mesh

Dory Ames from Maine is one of the latest women to file a lawsuit against the makers of transvaginal mesh claiming the device caused serious injuries. Manufacturers of these bladder slings face tens of thousands of lawsuits alleging the companies marketed the devices knowing they were defective and could cause harm to women. Transvaginal mesh is a type of surgical mesh used to treat common pelvic floor disorders known as pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. The mesh is inserted through the vagina to hold up organs that have dropped or protruded due to childbirth, age, weight gain, or ... Read More

European authorities call for review of transvaginal mesh safety

European drug and medical device regulators have asked a scientific committee to review the safety of transvaginal mesh devices and whether the risks outweigh the benefits. The European Commission charged its Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks to conduct the analysis on the surgical mesh products used to treat common pelvic floor disorders such as pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. The request is based on mounting reports of injuries associated with the devices, which range in severity and include complications such as rejection, tissue erosion, mesh exposure and shrinkage resulting in symptoms such as chronic ... Read More

Transvaginal mesh side effects likely caused by defective design

Two women were told they could no longer have sexual intercourse with their partners after suffering complications related to their transvaginal mesh. “We’ve not got a sex life. It’s actually taken a toll on my marriage,” Linda, whose name was changed, told BBC. “I don’t even go to the doctor. I don’t even bother.” Both women were implanted with transvaginal mesh, a type of surgical mesh used to treat pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence, common conditions that affect women due to childbirth, age or weight gain. Both women say they were injured by the devices and live in ... Read More

Johnson and Johnson wants to conceal failure to preserve evidence in transvaginal mesh lawsuit

Johnson & Johnson is asking a West Virginia federal judge not to allow the plaintiff in an upcoming bellwether trial in multidistrict litigation over injuries caused by its transvaginal mesh to tell jurors that the company failed to preserve evidence. Johnson & Johnson claims the issue is no longer relevant to the case. U.S. Magistrate Judge Cheryl Eifert found the consumer health care giant had lost potential evidence in the case and suggested that jurors may need to hear about circumstances such as when a plaintiff’s physician relied on evidence provided by a sales representative whose records were destroyed. The ... Read More

Researchers credit increase in IUD use for a decrease in abortions

An increase in the number of women using intrauterine devices, or IUDs, for birth control may be credited for a drop in the number of abortions, a new study reports. The rate of abortions has dropped steadily in the past 20 years from about 19.4 per 1,000 women ages 15 to 44 in 1991 to a rate of 16.9 percent per 1,000 women, and there was a 13 percent drop since 2008. Lawmakers may boast state laws restrict abortion but researchers with Guttmacher Institute, a reproductive-health research organization, say there is “no evidence” to support that assumption. After all, most ... Read More

NuvaRing makers covered up blood clot risks with contraceptive device

Early one morning in June 2008, Lyndsey Agresta, then 27, called her mother and asked for help. She had an unbearable headache and asked her mother to drive her to the emergency room and look after her 5-year-old son. That was when “everything changed,” her mother, Diane Agresta recalls. Doctors discovered bleeding on her brain caused by a blood clot. It was an unusual diagnosis for a young woman, and doctors suspected her NuvaRing contraceptive device likely contributed to the blood clot. Doctors surgically removed two-thirds of Lyndsey’s right cerebral hemisphere, which left her paralyzed and in need of round-the-clock ... Read More

Bayer markets Mirena-like IUD for adolescents despite Mirena IUD injury lawsuits

A new intrauterine device is being marketed in the United States with sexually active adolescents in mind. Skyla, made by Bayer Healthcare, is raising concerns among some experts not because it is geared toward younger women, but because some IUDs, especially the Mirena, also made by Bayer, have been associated with injuries, some of which have been serious. Skyla is a new version of Bayer’s Mirena. Both deliver a steady dose of the hormone levonorgestrel, but Skyla is smaller than the Mirena, lasts up to three years as opposed to five years with Mirena, and contains less of the hormone ... Read More

New IUD insertion device aims to cut down on uterine perforation

New Orleans-based company Bioceptive has created a device that it says makes the insertion of intrauterine devices – or IUDs – simpler, thus cutting down on the technical training required for health providers. The inserter automates some of the insertion process and allows the health care provider to guide the IUD into the intended place and reduce the chance of uterine perforation. IUDs tear through the uterine wall about once or twice for every 1,000 insertions, and the risk is even greater when the device is inserted by an inexperienced health care provider. Women who have had fewer children also ... Read More