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Johnson & Johnson 778 articles

J&J stocks tumble in wake of scathing Reuters report

Johnson & Johnson’s stock prices fell more than 10 percent – from $147 per share to $130 – after Reuters reported that an examination of the company’s internal documents revealed that J&J’s talcum powder was contaminated with cancer-causing asbestos and that the company took measures to hide this information from regulators and the public. The consumer health care giant, facing more 11,000 lawsuits alleging its talc-containing products have caused cancers like mesothelioma and ovarian cancer, has continuously defended the safety of its products. And while J&J has won some of the cases, its losses have been substantial, including a $4.69 ... Read More

J&J knew for decades its talc contained asbestos

Nearly 20 years ago, Darlene Coker sued Johnson & Johnson. She had been diagnosed with mesothelioma, a rare but deadly form of cancer that is caused by asbestos exposure. How could the 52-year-old who ran a massage school in eastern Texas while raising two daughters develop the disease? It must have been the Johnson’s Baby Powder she regularly dusted on her children and herself. Talc, like asbestos, is mined from the earth. To her and her attorney, it wasn’t too far a leap to suggest J&J’s talc-containing product could have contained asbestos and caused her deadly disease. Coker sought to ... Read More

Canada assessment finds ‘Talc may be harmful to human health’

Government officials in Canada are considering prohibiting or restricting the use of talc in certain cosmetics and other products after an assessment of the mineral by Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada raised concerns about its risks to public health and the environment. “Most uses of talc (such as in paper, plastics, paint, ceramics, putties, food, as well as many cosmetics, natural health products and non-prescription drugs) are not a concern to human health,” Health Canada said. “However, based on the latest science and the draft screening assessment, the Government of Canada proposes that inhaling loose talc powders ... Read More

J&J expected to fight $4.69 billion talc verdict

Johnson & Johnson is expected to ask the Missouri Circuit Court in St. Louis City to undo or, at the very least, reduce a $4.69 billion verdict awarded to 22 women who accused the company’s talcum powder of being contaminated with asbestos and causing their ovarian cancer. But the women say the verdict should stand because the “vast majority of evidence” shows the company was aware its talc-containing products were dangerous but continued to sell the product without warning consumers. The Aug. 22 verdict includes $4.14 billion in punitive damages and $550 million in compensatory damages against Johnson & Johnson’s ... Read More

Second mistrial in case alleging J&J talc caused rare cancer

The second jury charged with deciding whether Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products were tainted with asbestos and caused a woman’s rare cancer, ended in a deadlock. The news rang eerily similar to the first trial in the case of the late Bertila Boyd-Bostic. It ended in May with a hung jury as well. Boyd-Bostic and her surviving husband and former law partner, Antoine Bostic, brought the case against Johnson & Johnson shortly after Boyd-Bostic was diagnosed with mesothelioma in the spring of 2017. She died October 2017. Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer is caused by asbestos exposure. ... Read More

J&J should pay for deceased talc user’s death, attorney says

Counsel for the husband of an attorney who died from a rare and deadly disease allegedly caused by years of using asbestos-tainted Johnson’s Baby Powder told a South Carolina jury this week that Johnson & Johnson should pay more tens of millions of dollars for the woman’s wrongful death. Bertila Boyd-Bostic claimed she used Johnson’s Baby Powder her entire life containing talc that came from a particular mine in Vermont. Johnson & Johnson allegedly knew for years that the talc mined there also contained cancer-causing asbestos, yet the company continued to use the talc in its products and never warned ... Read More

J&J agrees to settle many Invokana side effects lawsuits

Johnson & Johnson has agreed to pay an undisclosed amount to settle a large number of lawsuits pending in a multidistrict litigation in New Jersey accusing the company’s diabetes drug Invokana of causing kidney failure, diabetic ketoacidosis or amputations, according to the New Jersey Law Journal. A settlement fund is expected to be ruled on by Nov. 19. It’s unclear how many of the more than 1,000 cases are included in the settlement, but attorneys say more settlements are likely. Bellwethers from the multidistrict litigation were set to go to trial as early as January 2019, but those orders were ... Read More

J&J revamps baby line to win back sales

Johnson & Johnson is revamping its Johnson’s baby product line, starting with removing the chemical dye from its golden-colored baby shampoo. The company is also making updates to the packaging of its baby products and rolling out a new digital marketing campaign in an effort to regain the dominancy it held for decades in the baby-care market. J&J jumped into the baby-care market as an afterthought. The company was founded in 1886 as a supplier of medical products like bandages and plasters. But removing them was painful, so the company’s chief scientist offered talcum powder to soothe the skin. Parents ... Read More

Woman blames ovarian cancer on J&J talc

The year before Evelyn Hampton was born, the first study appeared linking talc to ovarian cancer. But neither she nor her family were warned about this association. Instead they trusted Johnson & Johnson when the company promoted its talcum powder products as safe enough for everyday use. Hampton became a loyal customer. By 1982, when Hampton was 10, researchers conducted the first epidemiological study on genital use of talcum powder for feminine hygiene and found that women who used talc in this fashion had a 92 percent greater risk of developing ovarian cancer, Hampton claims. One scientist, Daniel Cramer, even ... Read More

Workers, women seek compensation for asbestos-related cancer

The initial reaction to a cancer diagnosis is often shock and disbelief, and it’s not uncommon for patients to try to understand why their cancer developed in the first place, according to the consumer publication CURE (Cancer Updates, Research & Education). Ovarian cancer and mesothelioma victims often find out too late that they were exposed to the carcinogenic mineral asbestos either at the workplace or from using talcum powder products. Ovarian cancer is the most deadly form of cancer of the female reproductive organs. Studies suggest using talcum powder products on the genitals for feminine hygiene could put women at ... Read More