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NSF 16 articles

FDA requires new warnings on gadolinium-based contrast agents

Five years after the food and Drug Administration first alerted medical professionals about a possible link between gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) and a serious kidney dysfunction known as Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), the agency this week announced it is requiring changes to the drug’s professional labeling in an effort to minimize the risk. The agency noted that NSF after GBCAs has not been reported in patients with normal kidney function, and that patients at greatest risk for developing the condition after GBCAs are those with impaired elimination of the drug, including patients with acute kidney injury or chronic, severe kidney ... Read More

Beasley Allen files two gadolinium lawsuits

Today Beasley Allen filed two complaints in multidistrict litigation (MDL) on behalf of clients injured by gadolinium. Gadolinium is linked to adverse health effects on patients with renal insufficiency or kidney failure, including Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), which causes fibrosis of the skin and connective tissues and scarring of organs including lungs, heart, and liver and may lead to death. Beasley Allen attorneys Andy D. Birchfield, Jr., and Benjamin L. Locklar filed the complaint in United States District Court, Northern District of Ohio Eastern Division under Judge Dan Aaron Polster on behalf of plaintiffs Caroll L. Jett, a resident of ... Read More

Gadolinium federal lawsuits move ahead

Injecting a toxic liquid metal such as gadolinium into the bloodstream may seem like a procedure from a sci-fi horror movie, but it is a common, every day occurrence in medical centers throughout the country. When gadolinium is in the bloodstream, medical imaging devices produce clearer, more defined images of the patient’s blood vessels. Since gadolinium is extremely toxic to human tissue, it must first be coated with a benign chemical before being injected into the patient. Over the course of time, the body expels the metal through the kidneys. Patients with poor kidneys, however, experience a buildup of the toxic ... Read More

NSF study finds link between Gadolinium used in MRI and debilitating disease

Another Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF) study has tied the debilitating condition to Gadolinium contrast agents used in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This latest NSF research was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), which examined a cluster of NSF patients at one unidentified St. Louis Missouri Hospital. The CDC found that the exposure to Gadolinium contrast dyes during MRI was independently associated with the development of NSF. NSF (sometimes called Nephrogenic Fibrosing Dermopathy or NFD) was first seen in patients in 1997, and it wasn’t mentioned in medical literature until 2000. NSF leads to excessive formation of connective tissue ... Read More

Gadolinium based MRI contrast agents put kidney patients at risk

Gadolinium based MRI contrast agents have been implicated in at least 1,000 cases of a debilitating disorder called Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis/ Nephrogenic Fibrosing Dermopathy (NSF/NSD) around the world. This horrible disease causes a buildup of collagen in tissues, leading to a severe thickening and hardening of the skin. NSF/NSD can completely immobilize patients, and in severe cases it can lead to death. NSF/NSD is a rare disease that so far has affected only people with pre-existing kidney problems. The first case of NSF/NSD was reported in 1997, and it wasn’t mentioned in medical literature until 2000. NSF/NSD leads to excessive ... Read More

Some kidney patients suffer MRI poisoning

A growing number of people are becoming afflicted with an incurable, man-made disease that is related to a common medical procedure performed every single day in this country, a KCRA 3 investigation has found. Sarah Fracella is one the victims. The 38-year-old Santa Barbara resident said what happened to her is “devastating.” The issue involves magnetic resonance imaging scans that include the use of a contrast dye containing gadolinium. For people with healthy, functioning kidneys, the risk of using the element gadolinium to pinpoint potential health problems in MRI scans is zero. “Gadolinium is extremely safe,” said neuroradiologist David Seidenwurm ... Read More

Common MRI poisoning some kidney patients

If she knew then what she knows now, Sarah Fracella would not have undergone an MRI. “I don’t think there’s been a day in the last, probably, two years that’s gone by that I haven’t cried at least once about this,” said Fracella, 38, of Santa Barbara, whose skin is hardening painfully into something that looks startlingly like marble. Fracella is one of as many as 1,000 people worldwide who have contracted a debilitating, incurable and sometimes fatal disease called nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, or NSF, from the dye that is used in millions of magnetic resonance imaging scans every year. ... Read More

Gadolinium contrast agents used off-label in MRAs pose even greater risk

Gadolinium based contrast agents used during MRIs, are known to be associated with the onset of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis/ Nephrogenic Fibrosing Dermopathy (NSF/NSD) in patients with pre-existing kidney disease. But the use of gadolinium in a procedure call Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) could put these patients at an even greater risk of developing NSF/NSD, because these procedures often use far more gadolinium than a typical MRI. The use of gadolinium contrast agents in MRAs is a growing practice, even though the Food Drug Administration (FDA) never approved gadolinium for MRAs. An MRA is a variation of a traditional MRI that ... Read More

NorCal man blames MRI dyes for illness

An elderly man has sued several major health companies, claiming the dyes used to scan his failing kidneys caused a rare, painful and incurable disease. Peter Gerber, 72, of San Rafael, contends that injections of dyes containing the heavy metal gadolinium caused him to develop nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, or NSF. Also known as nephrogenic fibrosing demopathy, the disease can thicken the skin, stiffen joints, restrict movement and potentially lead to death if it affects internal organs. Only about 215 cases have been reported worldwide, all involving people with kidney disease. No cures have been reported but some patients have seen ... Read More

A new concern for end-stage renal disease patients

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a new fibrotic skin disease entity that was first recognized in 1997 in 15 patients receiving hemodialysis. Early reports noted that NSF closely resembled scleromyxedema, but had a number of differentiating features. The entity was initially termed nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy, and a case definition was established based on its characteristic clinical and histopathologic features. The name was later changed to NSF in view of the systemic nature of the disorder and recognition of the role circulating fibrocytes play in mediating NSF. Underlying renal impairment is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of NSF, and 90% of ... Read More