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After Three Failed Attempts, retrievable IVC Filter Could Not be Removed

When Jesse K. was in a car accident, Luther Hospital in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, implanted an Option ELITE Retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter on Dec. 7, 2015, even though he did not have a blood clot. An IVC filter is a device that resembles a spider, inserted into the largest vein in the body, the vena cava. It is designed to catch blood clots before they enter the heart or lungs causing pulmonary embolism. Some IVC filters are designed to stay in the body permanently and others are made to be temporary, or retrievable. Retrievable IVC filters are recommended by the U.S. Food and ... Read More

Alabama man files lawsuit alleging injuries linked to retrievable IVC filter

When Billy J. S., an Alabama resident, was found to be at serious risk for a blood clot in January 2007, he was implanted with a Recovery inferior vena cava (IVC) filter at a local hospital in the state. The filter is a small, cage-like device inserted into the inferior vena cava to capture blood clots and prevent them from reaching the lungs. Billy didn’t know that the Recovery filter had been pulled from the market two years earlier due to reported injuries and deaths linked to the device. No recall or safety warnings were issued. Doctors and patients remained unaware ... Read More

Alabama Man Files IVC Filter Lawsuit Against C.R. Bard

Kyler K., an Alabama resident, has joined more than 1,400 others in a lawsuit against C.R. Bard for problems allegedly tied to the company’s inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, which his lawsuit says failed. Kyler was implanted with a Meridian IVC filter on April 23, 2013. This model is a fifth generation temporary design that was approved for sale in 2011. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that temporary, or retrievable, IVC filters be removed between 29 and 54 days.. However, in many cases, if the filter has migrated or perforated the vein, the device is rendered impossible to retrieve. The risk of injury ... Read More

Implantable birth control microchip to enter pre-clinical trials next year

A new implantable birth control device containing the hormone levonorgestral that lasts 16 years and can be turned off and on with a wireless remote is currently in development and will enter pre-clinical testing next year. The chip is designed to be implanted under the skin at the buttocks, upper arm, or abdomen, and if tests prove it to be safe and effective, the device could be on the market as early as 2018. The concept of a birth control chip originated two years ago when Bill Gates and his colleagues visited Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and asked technicians ... Read More

5 health products that are dangerous to women

Medical devices, prescription drugs, and even consumer products offer unique benefits to women. But sometimes they can cause unexpected harm. Here are some products that women should use with caution: 1. Talcum powder – It might sound far-fetched, but women who apply baby powder or body powder regularly to their genitals are a third more likely to develop ovarian cancer than women who do not use the product. Talcum powder, derived from talc, contains various elements, including asbestos, which is a known carcinogen. Researchers say the powder when applied to the genitals can travel up the vagina through the uterus ... Read More