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pilots 7 articles

Last unresolved lawsuit from Continental Flight 3407 crash headed to trial

One wrongful death lawsuit stemming from the crash of Continental Airlines Flight 3407 in Clarence Center, New York, has not been resolved, and the case appears to be headed to trial in the coming months. Flight 3407 crashed on Feb. 12, 2009, as the twin-turbo prop airplane was making its final approach to Buffalo Niagara International Airport. The crash killed all 49 people aboard the airplane and one person on the ground — 61-year-old Doug Wielinski, who was at home with his wife and daughter when the airplane hit his house. It’s the Wielinski family’s lawsuit that remains unresolved out ... Read More

Firefighter won’t be charged in runway death of Asiana crash survivor

SAN FRANCISCO — A firefighter facing potential criminal charges for accidentally running over and killing a plane crash survivor will not be charged for the girl’s death, San Mateo County’s District Attorney announced. Investigators believe 16-year-old Ye Mengyuan was tossed from Asiana flight 214 as it crash-landed and tumbled down the runway at San Francisco International Airport July 6. The Boeing 777 broke apart on impact and burst into flames. The crash injured 181 of the 307 people aboard, 12 of them critically. Three students, including Ms. Ye and her close friend Wang Linjia, lost their lives. Ms. Ye was one ... Read More

More Asiana crash survivors file complaints against Boeing alleging mechanical deficiencies

Six personal-injury lawsuits have been filed against Boeing by Asiana passengers who allege the aircraft manufacturer failed to install a low-airspeed warning system in some of its airplane models, including the 777 that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport July 6. The lawsuits, which were filed in Boeing’s home state of Illinois, claim that the company knew of several previous incidents on Boeing airplanes in which a low-speed warning failed to alert pilots, but neglected to address the problem in its 777 models. The Asiana 214 crash killed two teenage girls. A third teenage girl was thrown from the plane ... Read More

The top 10 deadliest jobs in America

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2009, 4,340 workers left for work never to return home. This number represents a significant decline in the number of fatal on-the-job accidents from 2008, when 5,214 workers lost their lives, but many labor analysts suspect workplace fatalities will rise again in proportion to economic gains and rise in employment. The agency also analyzed these workplace fatalities to determine the top 10 most deadly jobs in America. 1. Fisherman (118 deaths per 100,000) Storms, wind, rogue waves, violent seas, dangerous equipment, illness, isolation, and the constant risk of hypothermia and drowning ... Read More

Working conditions may have contributed to Colgan air crash

When one thinks of commercial airline pilots, one doesn’t ordinarily think of working part-time at a coffee shop, living with mom and dad, sleeping on crew lounge couches, and making $16,000 per year. But at that rate of pay, what other options are there? That was the life of Rebecca Shaw, first officer of Continental Connection flight 3407, which crashed after stalling in skies above Buffalo, New York. Tuesday we wrote that the National Transportation Safety Board was focusing its investigations on how much training and experience Captain Marvin Renslow had and whether he was competent enough to pull the ... Read More

Investigators focus on pilot competency in Buffalo plane crash

Serious questions have arisen about the competency and training of the pilot who was in charge of flying the Colgan Air commuter plane when it crashed last February in Buffalo, New York. The crash claimed the lives of all 49 people aboard and one person on the ground. Investigators will announce their findings tomorrow in the case. Transcripts of the cockpit conversation revealed that Captain Marvin Renslow and first officer Rebecca Shaw were likely not adequately trained and experienced to handle the particular flying conditions they faced. Moreover, the crew may have violated the cockpit rule of refraining from “irrelevant ... Read More

FAA Bans Chantix

The Wall Street Journal reported in its Health Blog on May 21 that the Federal Aviation Administration has banned the stop-smoking drug Chantix for pilots and air traffic controllers. According to the report, Pfizer’s smoking-cessation drug Chantix came in for a bit more trouble as a research group cited reports of physical side effects associated with the drug. The FAA, which reviewed the report, barred pilots and air traffic controllers from taking the drug, the WSJ reports. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices examined adverse-event reports turned into the FDA in the fourth quarter of last year, and found 988 ... Read More