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PTC 8 articles

Positive Train Control (PTC) Delayed on Metro-North for Another Two Years

Positive Train Control or PTC, the technology that can automatically slow trains in dangerous sections of track, will not be installed in the Metro-North rail system for another two years after federal regulators gave the railroad a deadline extension. Metro-North, the New York City-based commuter rail operated by New York’s Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA), was supposed to have PTC up and running on all of its trains by Dec. 31, 2018. The rail says it has achieved critical benchmarks in its implementation of PTC technology across its 800 miles of track, but it needs more time to complete installation and ... Read More

Conductor’s Widow Sues Amtrak, CSX Over Deadly South Carolina Crash

Amtrak and CSX are facing a lawsuit filed by the widow of the train engineer who was killed Feb. 4 when Amtrak Train 91 was wrongfully diverted onto a side track, where it collided with a CSX freight train near Cayce, South Carolina. Attorneys for Christine Cella and her two children filed the lawsuit against Amtrak and CSX alleging negligence in the operation of a track switch caused 36-year-old Michael Cella’s death. The collision also killed 54-year-old Amtrak engineer Michael Kempf and injured 116 passengers and crew aboard the train, which was traveling from New York to Miami. The National ... Read More

Conductor Injured In Washington Derailment Sues Amtrak

An Amtrak conductor on a training run of the Cascades 501 that derailed in DuPont, Washington, Dec. 18 is one of the first people to sue the railroad as a result of the accident. Garrick Freeman, a 48-year-old Amtrak conductor, was among the 80 people injured when the train derailed as it sped into a downward curve at more than twice the speed limit. Thirteen of the train’s cars leaped the tracks on an overpass and landed on cars and trucks on Interstate 5 below. Three people were killed. Mr. Freeman, who was with the train’s engineer in the lead ... Read More

150 Train Crashes, Hundreds of Deaths Preventable With Speed Control

Railroad data obtained by the Associated Press shows that nearly 300 people have been killed and several thousand maimed in 150 U.S. train crashes that could have been prevented had rail companies installed the speed-control technology that federal safety investigators have been advocating for decades. According to the AP, National Transportation Board (NTSB) investigators first pushed for “automatic train control” in 1969, after two Penn Central commuter trains crashed into each other in Darien, Connecticut, killing four people and injuring 43. Since that crash, there have been 298 deaths, 6,763 injuries, and $385 million in property damages in train crashes ... Read More

Distraction, Lost Situational Awareness Led to Deadly Philadelphia Amtrak Crash, NTSB Says

The engineer of the Amtrak that derailed and crashed in Philadelphia last year was distracted by radio reports about an emergency situation on another train, federal investigators said in a final report of the disaster that left eight people dead and injured more than 200 others. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has extensively interviewed Amtrak train 188 engineer Brandon Bostian, 32, over the past year to determine how a “qualified, experienced and apparently alert engineer” could have pulled the throttle to its highest position ahead of a notoriously sharp bend in the rails. The train sped to 106 mph, ... Read More

Momentary Confusion, Rock Thrown At Train Likely Contributed To Amtrak 188 Crash

When Amtrak 188 derailed and crashed in Philadelphia last year, killing eight people and injuring hundreds of others, investigators quickly honed in on Brandon Bostian, the train’s engineer, to understand what caused the worst U.S. rail disaster in decades. Ruling out drugs or alcohol and lack of experience, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) endeavored to find if maybe Mr. Bostian, who strongly advocated for better railroad safety in past years, may have been distracted by his cell phone when he lost control of the train. But it turns out another distraction, coupled with what investigators call “lost situational awareness” ... Read More

Lawsuits against Bayer alleging neurological side effects from Mirena IUD will not be centralized

Nine lawsuits against Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals alleging the company’s Mirena IUD caused neurological conditions will not be consolidated into a multidistrict litigation because there are just too few to justify the motion. Plaintiffs had asked that the lawsuits be centralized in Tennessee; Bayer opposed centralization or to have them consolidated in New York. Bayer already faces multidistrict litigation with its Mirena intrauterine device over uterine perforation, a different injury. These nine lawsuits claim that the Mirena IUD contraceptive device releases a synthetic hormone that can cause neurological problems, including a type of brain damage known as pseudo tumor cerebra (PTC) ... Read More

Lawsuits allege Mirena IUD caused brain damage

“I was one of the lucky ones,” writes “Proud Mama Fighting Back,” who describes herself as a “post Mirena survivor,” and chronicles her “Mirena nightmare” on her blogspot site, MyLifeAfterMirena. She says she was lucky because after having the Mirena intrauterine device inserted, she lost most of her vision in her right eye after two months. “I went from great vision to legally blind in that eye virtually overnight,” she writes. That’s when the blogger learned about a connection between the Mirena IUD and pseudo tumor cerebra (PTC), also known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a type of brain damage in which too ... Read More