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talcum powder 45 articles

Cancer Society addresses ovarian cancer risks with talcum powder products

The American Cancer Society has updated its website with more detailed information about the link between talcum powder and cancer as lawsuits mount against consumer health care giant Johnson & Johnson alleging the company refuses to warn consumers that its talc-containing products put women at risk for ovarian cancer. Talcum powder is made from talc, a mineral that contains elements such as magnesium, silicon and oxygen. When grinded down to an absorbant powder, known as talcum powder, it is used to cut down on friction, keep skin dry, and to prevent rashes. In its natural form, talc may contain asbestos, ... Read More

Class action lawsuit calls for advertising campaign to warn of ovarian cancer risks with baby powder

A class action lawsuit has been filed against consumer health care giant Johnson & Johnson alleging the company’s baby powder causes ovarian cancer. The lawsuit claims that Johnson & Johnson was aware of the risks but failed to warn consumers, instead marketing the product as safe. The class action comes as many similar ovarian cancer lawsuits have been filed against Johnson & Johnson. The complaints allege that the company’s products contain talcum powder, derived from talc, which is a known carcinogen. When used for personal hygiene in the genital area, researchers have found that the talc can travel up the uterus, ... Read More

Study links personal hygiene use of body powder to ovarian cancer

An estimated 40 percent of women use talcum powder in the genital area for personal hygiene, but the practice may be putting them at an increased risk of developing deadly ovarian cancer, a new study suggests. The journal Cancer Prevention Research recently published a study that showed regular use of talc-containing powder applied to the genital area was associated with a 24 percent increased risk of ovarian tumors. The study, conducted by researches with Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed data from 8,525 women who had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer and an additional 9,800 women who did not ... Read More

Doctor advises patients to stop using talc for personal hygiene

“I have always advised gynecologists [that] if they examine a woman and see she is using talc in the vaginal area, to tell her to stop,” Daniel W. Cramer, MD, a gynecologic oncologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass., said in an interview at an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) meeting. Cramer’s advice is based on the results of more than 20 epidemiologic studies that have linked the use of talcum-based powders in the genital area to a 30 percent greater risk of developing ovarian cancer. That risk increased by three- to fourfold among women who used ... Read More

Talcum powder for personal hygiene increases ovarian cancer risk

Women who use products containing talcum powder on their genitals for personal hygiene are at an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research. Several small studies have been conducted and show evidence of ovarian cancer risk among women who use powder on their genitals. However, the data has not produced strong enough findings. Researchers with the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center in Boston, Mass., conducted a meta-analysis of several studies to see if they could strengthen or weaken ovarian cancer claims with genital powder use. Their ... Read More

Does baby powder cause ovarian cancer?

Talcum powder, also known as body powder or baby powder, offers a soft, pleasant-smelling way of keeping skin dry in order to prevent rashes, but it could cause more harm than good. A new analysis of eight research papers involving nearly 2,000 women found that those who used talcum powder on their genital areas were at a 20 to 30 percent greater risk of developing ovarian cancer. Talcum powder comes from the milling of talc rocks and contains minerals such as magnesium and silicon. The powder used to contain asbestos, known to cause mesothelioma, a type of cancer of the ... Read More

Dr. Weil warns against using baby powder on infants

Don’t be fooled by names, baby powder should not be used on infants, warns Dr. Andrew Weil, medical doctor and writer on holistic health. “The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends against using baby powder as do many individual pediatricians,” he says. The issue is talcum powder, derived from talc, a mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate. It may also contain asbestos, a mineral that has been linked to lung cancer. The danger in using baby powder on infants, Dr. Weil says, “is that babies can easily inhale tiny particles of it that are light enough to be carried in the ... Read More

School’s baby powder ritual banned due to health hazards

A Michigan high school ritual has been labeled hazardous by school officials and is now banned from school sporting events. Students from Dexter High School have started clapping and spraying baby powder into the air during football games, creating huge clouds and a residual white dusting on those nearby. When the powder-puffing fans, about three dozen in total, moved the ritual indoors for basketball games, the fun turned into a frenzy. Visitors starting having breathing problems, and janitors were forced to clean up the mess during half time. The school’s principal issued a public statement asking students to stop tossing ... Read More

5 health products that are dangerous to women

Medical devices, prescription drugs, and even consumer products offer unique benefits to women. But sometimes they can cause unexpected harm. Here are some products that women should use with caution: 1. Talcum powder – It might sound far-fetched, but women who apply baby powder or body powder regularly to their genitals are a third more likely to develop ovarian cancer than women who do not use the product. Talcum powder, derived from talc, contains various elements, including asbestos, which is a known carcinogen. Researchers say the powder when applied to the genitals can travel up the vagina through the uterus ... Read More

Five-year-old study shows heightened risk of ovarian cancer with use of talcum powder

More than five years ago, scientists from Harvard Medical School warned that women using talcum powder products in the genital area could be at serious risk of developing deadly ovarian cancer. The warning was based on a theory that the talcum powder in these products could travel to the ovaries and trigger a process of inflammation that allows cancer cells to flourish. It had been considered a remote risk at best. Even so, a team of Harvard researchers decided to put the theory to a test. They studied more than 3,000 women and found that women who used talc in their ... Read More