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talcum powder 48 articles

Johnson and Johnson files motion to dismiss baby powder-ovarian cancer lawsuit

Johnson & Johnson filed a motion in Illinois court to dismiss a proposed class action lawsuit alleging the consumer health care company’s classic baby powder products increase the risk of ovarian cancer. Johnson & Johnson says plaintiff Barbara Mihalich has not developed ovarian cancer nor has she shown to suffer any injury from using the product, and thus has suffered no economic loss for which she should be compensated. She also did not claim that she bought the product to use for personal hygiene in her genital area, which the company says is the only use that the plaintiff claims ... Read More

Researchers aim to understand the potential harm in nanoparticles

When a mineral is broken down into smaller and smaller particles, or nanoparticles, its biological makeup can be affected, turning a seemingly harmless mineral into a potential lethal threat. Understanding which minerals’ nanoparticles pose risks is the work of a group of researchers at Northwest Nazarene University. Chemistry professor Jerry Harris refers to the book, “Asbestos: Silk of the Mineral Kingdom,” which was published in 1946 and touted the benefits of abestos. Asbestos became widely used in the United States throughout the 20th century as insulation because of its affordability and sound absorption. What researchers didn’t learn until decades later ... Read More

‘Below The Belt’ company introduces line of male personal hygiene products

Men should pay more attention to the personal hygiene of their most private body parts because, Jonathan Durden says, “our pants area is usually ignored. Which, considering that the contents of your boxers are trapped in muggy darkness for hours on end, sometimes chafing, often flapping about, is neither logical nor kind, given that these are sensitive parts of the male anatomy at the best of times.” After all, Durden says, consumer health care companies have spent millions of dollars developing products that cater to the care and grooming of women’s privates. Where are personal grooming products for men? “Where ... Read More

Cancer Society addresses ovarian cancer risks with talcum powder products

The American Cancer Society has updated its website with more detailed information about the link between talcum powder and cancer as lawsuits mount against consumer health care giant Johnson & Johnson alleging the company refuses to warn consumers that its talc-containing products put women at risk for ovarian cancer. Talcum powder is made from talc, a mineral that contains elements such as magnesium, silicon and oxygen. When grinded down to an absorbant powder, known as talcum powder, it is used to cut down on friction, keep skin dry, and to prevent rashes. In its natural form, talc may contain asbestos, ... Read More

Class action lawsuit calls for advertising campaign to warn of ovarian cancer risks with baby powder

A class action lawsuit has been filed against consumer health care giant Johnson & Johnson alleging the company’s baby powder causes ovarian cancer. The lawsuit claims that Johnson & Johnson was aware of the risks but failed to warn consumers, instead marketing the product as safe. The class action comes as many similar ovarian cancer lawsuits have been filed against Johnson & Johnson. The complaints allege that the company’s products contain talcum powder, derived from talc, which is a known carcinogen. When used for personal hygiene in the genital area, researchers have found that the talc can travel up the uterus, ... Read More

Study links personal hygiene use of body powder to ovarian cancer

An estimated 40 percent of women use talcum powder in the genital area for personal hygiene, but the practice may be putting them at an increased risk of developing deadly ovarian cancer, a new study suggests. The journal Cancer Prevention Research recently published a study that showed regular use of talc-containing powder applied to the genital area was associated with a 24 percent increased risk of ovarian tumors. The study, conducted by researches with Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed data from 8,525 women who had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer and an additional 9,800 women who did not ... Read More

Doctor advises patients to stop using talc for personal hygiene

“I have always advised gynecologists [that] if they examine a woman and see she is using talc in the vaginal area, to tell her to stop,” Daniel W. Cramer, MD, a gynecologic oncologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass., said in an interview at an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) meeting. Cramer’s advice is based on the results of more than 20 epidemiologic studies that have linked the use of talcum-based powders in the genital area to a 30 percent greater risk of developing ovarian cancer. That risk increased by three- to fourfold among women who used ... Read More

Talcum powder for personal hygiene increases ovarian cancer risk

Women who use products containing talcum powder on their genitals for personal hygiene are at an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research. Several small studies have been conducted and show evidence of ovarian cancer risk among women who use powder on their genitals. However, the data has not produced strong enough findings. Researchers with the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center in Boston, Mass., conducted a meta-analysis of several studies to see if they could strengthen or weaken ovarian cancer claims with genital powder use. Their ... Read More

Does baby powder cause ovarian cancer?

Talcum powder, also known as body powder or baby powder, offers a soft, pleasant-smelling way of keeping skin dry in order to prevent rashes, but it could cause more harm than good. A new analysis of eight research papers involving nearly 2,000 women found that those who used talcum powder on their genital areas were at a 20 to 30 percent greater risk of developing ovarian cancer. Talcum powder comes from the milling of talc rocks and contains minerals such as magnesium and silicon. The powder used to contain asbestos, known to cause mesothelioma, a type of cancer of the ... Read More

Dr. Weil warns against using baby powder on infants

Don’t be fooled by names, baby powder should not be used on infants, warns Dr. Andrew Weil, medical doctor and writer on holistic health. “The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends against using baby powder as do many individual pediatricians,” he says. The issue is talcum powder, derived from talc, a mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate. It may also contain asbestos, a mineral that has been linked to lung cancer. The danger in using baby powder on infants, Dr. Weil says, “is that babies can easily inhale tiny particles of it that are light enough to be carried in the ... Read More