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VAERS 20 articles

Gardasil distribution stalled in France pending government-ordered study

The distribution of Merck’s human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Gardasil has been halted in France, where a government-appointed group of immunologists and other researchers has been formed to determine if the benefits of the vaccine are worth the risks. As in the United States, Gardasil has become a “thorny subject” in France, with many parents suspicious of the vaccine’s benefits and fearful of its risks, according to France’s Le Point. Data pulled from the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) shows that from the time Gardasil was introduced in 2006 until September 15, 2011, 20,096 adverse events following the vaccine ... Read More

Group offers support network for girls injured by Gardasil

Girls who believe they have been harmed by Merck’s human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and their families shouldn’t have to feel alone when dealing with the devastating effects many people believe the drug can have, thanks to an international outreach of volunteers who can help answer questions and provide emotional support. The Guardian Angels, a support group encompassing 23 states and eight countries (including the United States), is made up of 42 volunteers who share knowledge and even personal — in some cases tragic — experience with the Gardasil vaccine. “We would eventually like to have a Guardian Angel in every ... Read More

Whose Gardasil study is this, anyway?

The results of a recently completed study were reported in USA Today on Jan. 28, which definitively declared that the HPV vaccine Gardasil does not trigger autoimmune disorders. The research was conducted in the wake of  public outcry and concern after thousands of reports were filed with the Center for Disease Control’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) indicating young girls were suffering serious side effects – and even death – after receiving one or more of the vaccine’s series of three shots. What a relief, right? Not so fast. Later in the article, the reader learns the research was ... Read More

New recommendations for Gardasil vaccine may put boys at risk

Despite outcry from parents of girls who have received the HPV vaccine Gardasil, and criticism about the vaccine’s effectiveness from one of its own creators, this month the American Academy of Pediatrics endorsed its use for boys. This follows a similar recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Critics of the vaccine, which has been linked to thousands of complaints of serious adverse side effects, are left to wonder why their voices are not being heard. When it was introduced by manufacturer Merck, Inc., in 2006, Gardasil was marketed as a preventative treatment for cervical cancer. A ... Read More

CDC recommends expansion of Gardasil use to boys

As expected, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advisory committee this week recommended expanding the use of the Gardasil vaccine, manufactured by Merck, to include boys and young men. The vaccine, which targets the human papillomavirus (HPV), previously has been recommended for girls, as a way to prevent cervical cancer caused by certain types of HPV. Gardsil use had already been approved by the FDA to treat boys in October 2009, although it was not yet given “recommended” status. The CDC reports that approximately 32 million doses of the vaccine have been distributed in the United States ... Read More

Did Bachmann overblow Gardasil side effects? What are the risks?

In this week’s GOP Presidential debate, candidate Michele Bachmann criticized Texas Governor and presidential candidate Rick Perry for his attempt to mandate the use of Gardasil in his state. Gardasil, manufactured by Merck, is promoted as a preventive treatment against human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted virus linked to the development of cervical cancer. Following a public outcry in the state of Texas, the mandate was overturned. Bachmann objected to the mandate for political reasons, but also expressed concerns that any parent might feel about being required to give their child a relatively new vaccine, about possible adverse side effects. ... Read More

Gardasil: do the benefits really outweigh the risks?

There is much debate about the vaccine Gardasil, which was introduced in 2006 for girls, and marketed as a weapon against cervical cancer. The vaccine actually targets human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted virus that is linked to the development of cervical cancer. While originally targeted only at girls and young women, the FDA recently expanded approval of the drug for use in boys and young men, to prevent the spread of HPV. However, since its introduction, Gardasil, which is manufactured by Merck & Co., has come under scrutiny following thousands of reports of serious adverse side effects tied to ... Read More

Vaccine watchdog group promotes letter writing campaign against Gardasil

S.A.N.E. Vax, Inc., a non-profit organization established to promote safe, affordable, necessary, effective vaccines and vaccination practices, has announced a combined effort of concerned citizens worldwide to insist on government compliance with regulations and guidelines in the implementation and monitoring of vaccines. In particular, the outreach effort is focusing on Gardasil, manfuactured by Merck and marketed as a preventive for cervical cancer by targeting the human papillomavirus (HPV). According to a recent news release, SaneVax is encouraging an open letter writing campaign addressing the issue of vaccine safety. The campaign is aimed at two senior scientists in the U.S. government ... Read More

Gardasil rushed to market despite low benefit vs risk ratio

Gardasil, a vaccine manufactured by Merck and promoted as a prevention for cervical cancer, was approved by the FDA in 2006. Later the same month, the vaccine was added to a list of recommended vaccines for girls ages 11-12 years. This, despite the fact that the first phase 3 trials of the vaccine were not yet complete. It would be almost a year later – May 2007 – before these studies were complete. Why the big rush? An editorial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in 2009 asks a number of important questions related to the ... Read More

Video links young woman’s illness to Gardasil vaccinations

Teenager Kirsten Jamison made a short film in 2009, dedicated to her friend Gabby Swank, who she said was seriously injured after receiving a series of Gardasil vaccines. The vaccine has been promoted since 2006 for girls and young women, as a preventive treatment against cervical cancer. The vaccine protects against four kinds of human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a sexually transmitted virus that can lead to cervical cancer. According to Kirsten’s video, featured on YouTube, Gabby was an active teenager, a cheerleader and gymnast with a 4.0 grade average. Until she received the Gardasil shots. Shortly after receiving the ... Read More