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West Virginia 209 articles

Proposed class of babies born addicted to opioids targets drug companies

More than 20 drug companies were hit with a proposed class action brought by dozens of children who were born addicted to opioid painkillers, a condition known as Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, or NAS. The latest attack in the fight to curb the opioid epidemic blames the pharmaceutical companies for ignoring regulations in order to increase their profits, which allowed the drugs into the black market, further fueling the nation’s opioid crisis. According to the 95-page complaint, the number of babies born addicted to opioids in the United States has jumped from 1.2 per 1,000 babies in 2000 to 5.8 per ... Read More

EPA draft questions safety of nonstick chemical compounds

Long-term exposure to a chemical compound used in nonstick coatings for products like pans, fast-food wrappers and firefighting foam, even in trace amounts, appears to be dangerous to humans, according to a draft released by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The chemical compound known as GenX was designed to be safer than previous stick- and stain-resistant compounds, known as PFAS (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalyl substances). The older versions have been found in dangerous levels in drinking water supplies across the country. That family of chemicals has been phased out of manufacturing in the U.S. due to health concerns. But EPA’s draft ... Read More

Truck Driver Awarded $5.4 Million After Amputation Accident

A federal jury in West Virginia ordered two trucking companies to pay a commercial truck driver more than $5.4 million after his foot was severely crushed on the job and he was forced to undergo a partial leg amputation. According to Land Line mag, plaintiff Richard Edwards Jr., a commercial truck driver, was helping his boss, David McGowan, to load metal pipes onto his truck with a forklift. Mr. Edwards drove trucks for McElliotts Trucking, a Huntington, West Virginia-based trucking firm owned by Mr. Edwards. Mr. McGowan first secured the forks of the forklift to a strap that wrapped around ... Read More

Opioid Use Disorder Quadruples Among Pregnant Women

Opioid use disorder (OUD) in pregnant women remains a serious concern among public health officials, who continue to fight fraud and abuse associated with the potent painkillers. Now a new study shows that the number of pregnant women with opioid abuse disorder more than quadrupled between 1999 and 2014. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the alarming trend, published Aug. 9 in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, was measured in pregnant mothers at the time of labor and delivery. Researchers used medical data from the 28 states that keep the records relevant to the ... Read More

Del Monte Vegetable Trays Linked to Second Midwest Cyclospora Outbreak

Del Monte vegetable trays have been linked to one of two separate outbreaks of cyclospora parasite in the Midwestern U.S., public health officials warn. Combined, the cyclospora outbreaks have sickened at least 400 people in every Midwest state along with Montana, Kentucky, and West Virginia. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 237 cases of cyclosporiasis in people who ate vegetables from Del Monte Fresh vegetable trays containing broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, celery, and dill dip. Reports of illnesses linked to cyclospora-contaminated Del Monte vegetable trays came from Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Of the people sickened after ... Read More

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Salmonella outbreak sickens 100

Boxes of Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal tainted with Salmonella are still being sold in some stores despite being recalled last month by the company, increasing the number of people who have fallen ill after eating the sweetened puffed wheat cereal to 100 in 33 states, 30 of whom have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported to date. Kellogg Company agreed to recall affected boxes of Honey Smacks in June after consulting with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and state partners. The products had been distributed across the United States including Guam ... Read More

Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Melons Grows

A melon recall triggered by a multistate outbreak of Salmonella-related illnesses has been expanded to include 10 additional states, bringing the total number of states affected by the outbreak to 23, according to federal health officials. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said the recall encompasses pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and fruit salads containing one or more of those melons produced and distributed by Caito Foods of Indianapolis, Indiana. Alabama, Florida, Kansas, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Tennessee have been added to the list of states where the melon may be contaminated with salmonella, the ... Read More

73 people infected with Salmonella after eating Honey Smacks cereal

At least 73 people in 31 states have fallen ill from Salmonella infections and health authorities say the likely culprit is Kellogg’s Honey Smacks sweetened puffed wheat cereal. As a result, the Kellogg Company has recalled the cereal, which was distributed throughout the United States as well as Guam and Saipan, and internationally in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, the Caribbean and Tahiti. Consumers are urged not to eat any of the recalled Honey Smacks cereal. Affected products include Honey Smacks 15.3 oz boxes with the BEST if Used By Date listed as JUN 14, 2018 through JUN 14, 2019, and ... Read More

Nashville’s Hepatitis A Outbreak Sickens At Least 14

Public health authorities in Tennessee say an outbreak of hepatitis A in the state has sickened at least 14 people in the Nashville area. The outbreak is one of a multitude of recent outbreaks ongoing nationwide, some of which have become unusually virile. Although the number of confirmed hepatitis A cases in Tennessee seems small, officials say the Nashville outbreak is almost certainly larger than it seems because the virus can exist dormant and undetected in the body for several weeks. This allows the highly contagious virus to spread exponentially among a population while health authorities search for sources. “However ... Read More

Drug execs deny fueling opioid epidemic

Four executives from drug distributors told members of the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations that their companies did not fuel the nation’s opioid epidemic, but one executive did express “personal regret for judgments that we’d make differently today,” Law360 reported. George Barrett, executive chairman of Cardinal Health, was referring specifically to opioid shipments his company and others made to two pharmacies in West Virginia, including one in Mount Gay-Shamrock, a town of just under 1,900 people, that received more than 16.5 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills from 2006 to 2016. “With the benefit of hindsight, I ... Read More